Cup mute resistence

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Jul 14, 2010
    I have recently acquired a cup mute. After sanding the cork to adjust the mute so that it is close to the bell. It seems the horn is much more difficult to play with it in, or compared to other mutes including a practice mute. It seems that it has much more resistance, though I think I could get used to the additional resistance for high notes and such. Is this normal for cup mutes?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It is normal that the corks are adjusted so that the INTONATION is OK. If you have sanded them down so that the cup mute is always tight, that is not really how it was designed to be used.

    The most free blowing cup mute that I have ever played was the Bach black plastic one. I use it still today. It is not so far in that the resonance of my horn is impeded.

    The mute sound is hard for the player to hear. 20 or 30 feet out, the audience hears something quite different.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    What brand mute is it?
     
  4. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Why does it need to be so close? As Rowuk stated, the corks should be sanded to bring the intonation in, not to make the mute look better in the horn bell. I sadly feer that you are going to have to have that brand new mute recorked.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Not new, and I already had to recork one of the corks. Humes and Berg!

    Maybe I will just use it with the trumpet not the cornet since it seems to sound better with one than the other.
     

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