Da dit dot

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Aug 8, 2009.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Da, Dit, Dot: Do you use it? When do you use it? Or do you have a substitute for Da, Dit, Dot? If so what is it? Why not Ta, Tit, Tot?

    crow
     
  2. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Maybe it's because I am a comeback player and have been out of the loop for awhile but I have never heard of this so I don't know if I use it or not. What the heck is it for?
     
  3. Trumpet guy

    Trumpet guy Forte User

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    da, dit, dot has a softer attack while the "t" variations have a more defined and sharp attack, more for fanfares and strong entrances. The "d" variations are said to be more agile when done correctly, especially with double tonguing. However, I think one of the etudes in the Arban's book mentions using the "t" variations for double tonguing rather than the "d" because of clarity issues. So they way I see it you use da, dit, dot for melodic, legato phrases and ta, tit, tot for accented or fast playing.
     
  4. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    I use tu or du
     
  5. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Well I have to say:

    "Da dit or did it, ta tit or tit bit, jarred it and dott de du du"....all is do do to me me.

    Guys and Gals - you start with the "Tu" attack for clear articulation, double and triple tongueing and clear staccato....How else? Then "Du" gives a softer articulation..

    After that you can use different mouth combinations, cavity shapes, tongue and teeth positions and even air leaks to differ sound attacks. Are we over analysing the sound out of the horn here?? It is the sound that matters.
     
  6. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    Rich Matteson used these syllables to teach jazz articulations. Doo was a long note, dit was a stacatto, and dot was a rooftop accent.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Howdy, Crow--good to see you back here!
    No reason for the "D." "T" works as well. When studying, I was taught NEVER to end a note with the tongue, until I got a symphony gig, and the conductor demanded some short notes. I dunno, but I did get tenure.
     
  8. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I didn't want to be specific in my first Thread because I didn't want answers to be influenced....but here's the skinny on Da, Dit, Dot, as I'm experiencing it. I'm working from the Effective Etudes For Jazz book. Learning the Jazz style is one of the purposes of the book. My natural instincts for playing in the jazz style is a very soft tounging. My teacher wants me to use Da, Dit, Dot. Although I'm following his instruction, I mostly find it a distraction, and not a noticable difference from my soft tounging where I'm not consiencly aware of what letters I'm using. For those that don't know how Da, Dit, Dot is being used, here it is as I'm instructed: Da for dragging a note, Dit for staccato, and Dot for accents. I'll follow my teacher's instruction because I do eventually discover the value. Although, my teacher does acknowledge that ultimately it will become my choice as to how to express my style of Jazz playing. Vulgano, thanks for welcoming back. I've consistantly been here, just fewer questions.

    crow
     
  9. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    I was also taught to never end a note with the tongue.
    Later in life when I took some lessons from a Symphony guy, he told me that one note ends with the start of the next. The tongue is a valve that turns on and off the air.
     
  10. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    Some jazz articulations call for the note to be ended with the tongue.
     

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