Dealing with pocket trumpet 3rd slide (Allora

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bumblebee, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I was partially responsible for somebody I know getting an Allora pocket trumpet. When I played it it seemed alright, but since then it has come back to me a few times for advice on moving the third valve slide. It's always sticking in some fashion - it comes out easily enough but is not easy to get back in, especially for a 10 year old. I've never had my own pocket trumpet so am unused to the technique in manipulating the third slide (see photo link for the style it is). I can only get it back in by rocking it gently up and down as I push (also gently). It takes a while and doesn't seem 'right'.

    http://bestbandinstruments.com/wp-c...el-Series-Pocket-Trumpet-Black-Nickel-0-0.jpg
    ...or here (seems to be a common configuration)
    http://images4.thomann.de/pics/prod/199416_large.jpg

    Is this just a poor design choice? Does anybody have a good one? Or the right technique?

    Thanks,
    --bumblebee
     
  2. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    What I do just pull the 3rd slide and keep it there and hold it like the pulled position.
    But really its a bother to move the 3rd slide on my pocket trumpet, plus my pocket trumpet's intonation is spot-on so.......
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    The problem here is when the boy pulls out the slides to empty them or clean them. He's not worried (yet) about tuning.

    --bumblebee
     
  4. Dupac

    Dupac Fortissimo User

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    Better to do this: remove the mouthpiece and then rotate the whole horn to get out all the water that is inside. Don't forget to put back the mouthpiece before playing ROFL
     
  5. Dupac

    Dupac Fortissimo User

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    Otherwise, on my Jupiter pocket trumpets, I put short lenghts of small rope to prevent the slide from going out all the way.
     
  6. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    The problem is that the slide design is "oversquare". That is, the width between the tubes is greater than the slide length. We see this very often on trombone tuning slides. Slide fit, cleanliness, and lubrication choice are very critical in this setup, and if these are not optimal, the slide will rock going in, causing damage to the slide tubes and exacerbating the problem.

    My guess is that the slide has been too loose with inappropriate lubricant. This coupled with careless handling during removal. If the player is more concerned with water dumping than tuning adjustment, I suggest inspecting, re-rounding, and straightening the tubes (don't want the dents caused by heavy rocking), then use a heavy slide grease.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I will throw my two cents in. The slides are dirty. They need to be cleaned. That was the problem on my Jupiter and once I clean the slides it was fine but they do have to be cleaned and lubricated!
     
  8. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Try what Ivan suggested first. If that works, great. If not, there's another approach that might. Assuming that the slides haven't become deformed (not a very safe assumption, but let's go with it for now), I'd advise a thorough cleaning, being sure to hit the male slide components lightly with something mild like a Blitz cloth. Then lubricate the third (and first, if the design allows for it to be moved for on-the-fly tuning) slide with a lighter grease, such as UltraPure Light. Then teach the student when to use that slide, and help figure out which thumb is most comfortable for that purpose. It's still not a wonderful design, but I have a few pocket cornets and trumpets and have no real problems with that third slide as long as I'm gentle with it, keep it clean, and keep it well lubricated - and keep using it when it's needed, not just for dumping moisture. I wouldn't advise this approach if the slide is at all hard to move when adequately lubricated - that suggests you've got a problem that needs to be fixed. I've had good luck with it, though, when starting with new instruments.
     
  9. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Thanks - so if I read correctly some people have had this problem but it can be overcome. The slide looks straight and unbent. I had used slide oil on the slide but not my grease (which I thought too sticky) but now I'll suggest that (might test it first).

    --bumblebee
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Ivan's "oversquare" comment is spot on. Even clean and lubed, it isn't what we're used to and jamming can happen.
     

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