Deparate Help!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JHarris, Jul 18, 2004.

  1. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

    36
    0
    Jul 13, 2004
    Due to untimely cercumstances I have not been able to practice at all. First i had a vaction, then when I got bck I got my widsom teeth removed. All in all it has been about four weeks.

    What I would like to know is what is the most effecent way to build my chops up for marching band so I do not kill my chops? I am thinking longtone, lip slurs, and mp buzzing. Am I on the right track or am i missing something?

    Any help will do...

    Thanks,
    JHarris
     
  2. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
    1
    Nov 2, 2003
    dont forget to do some Clarke technical studies. good luck!
     
  3. AndrewsStrad0587

    AndrewsStrad0587 New Friend

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    Jul 9, 2004
    Columbus, Ga
    DUDE!!! I am in the same position that you were in. All I can say is practice everything and anything. My Wisdom teeth came out about 2 weeks ago, right after I was able to start playing again I got a cold sore were I place my mouthpeiece. Talk about bad luck. Soon I have to get my senior pictures taken. And my band camp offically starts tommorrow. My cold sore is almost gone.

    Work on octave jumps and long tones. Get your face ready for marching band.
     
  4. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    After a long lay off, long tones are extremely important -- both as a warm up and a warm down. It is kind of like long toss in baseball. Whatever you do, do plenty of long tones. Buzzing is another good thing to do -- again especially long tones.

    I think all of us have had periods of sickness (wisdom teeth), vacation, finals, work, travel that have kept us from the horn for extended periods. Long tones get you back in shape faster than anything and warming down makes sure your embouchure muscles relax after a workout.

    Another technique that a professional in NY taught me is a great variation on long-tones and develops your embouchure to be ready at any time.

    Take a C (Bb concert) scale and "place" the eight notes in your mind. Now, put your horn on your lap, bell down. Count 1, 2, 3, 4, play. Slowly during the counting, move the horn to a playing position and pick a note at random from the scale, say G. 1, 2, 3, 4 play. Hit the note right on center and hold it for at least eight counts. Put your horn bell down again, and keep doing this with any random note. Eventually you can grab your horn and hit any note in a split second. Your embouchure muscles develop a great "memory" for how be set, without having to think about the setup.

    Once I started this, my entrances improved GREATLY. I literally pick up the horn and play almost any note dead on. I teach it now to all my students.

    My nickel's worth.

    Jim
     
  5. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    Thanks,
    I was planing on doing long tone but I just wanted to pass the practice on by you guys.

    One other question....how long should I practice since i am recovering rom my wisdom teeth being removed?
     
  6. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    I think only you can answer that question. I would go easy at it for a day or two at least. You might consider several short sessions rather than one long one. Play until you feel fatigued, warm down and rest.

    No reason to push it early. But if you feel good, keep at it. Usually players can tell when they are too tired. My 7th grade son can tell when he is tired and he has been playing for only a year. You start chipping a lot of notes and the tone becomes less than desirable. Warm down and rest.

    Jim
     
  7. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    THat is exactly what I was looking for.

    Thank,
    JHARRIS
     

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