Developing Concentration Performance Skills

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jmberinger, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,964
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Mastering classical rests is simply getting to know the piece. Then you sit back and enjoy the scenery until you have to come in. I hate counting rests. It is an action that keeps me from enjoying the music. That is why I study the score and figure out when and why the composer wanted trumpets when they did. The rest is just preparation.
     
  2. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

    633
    240
    Jul 1, 2011

    This is my problem: Most classical literature bores me to tears. The reason I AVOID the whole idiom. I do play it well enough but then again how well does one have to play a trompette line from the 18th or 19th centuries? There are usually just bugle calls root, third fifth etc.

    So if for some reason i find myself within the confines of a freaking BORING classical orchestra? i count rests by remembering some event that happened in the corresponding year of my age. 13th measure of rest? My buddy Robert's bar Mitzvah etc.
     
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

    875
    202
    Jul 11, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    This is what we'll do sometimes in jazz band, too, because of the long solo sections where we sometimes won't have backgrounds. I figure we might as well enjoy the solo! Then we just wait for the chords to cycle around, and get ready when they do. Cheers
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,964
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    One of the reasons that I took up natural trumpet was to put this into perspective. Sorry that you aren't getting better classical gigs. I have never been bored by any genre.
     
  5. jmberinger

    jmberinger Pianissimo User

    97
    23
    Jun 5, 2007
    Long Beach, California
    Gentleman: I was not addressing the literature. There is much to be offered by symphonic literature, from the simplest to the most complicated. Whether it is reinforcement of the tonal texture, the compositional/metric procession or the driving component of the composition, I enjoy every minute of it.

    What I was trying to ask for assistance with was not the time in concert, but rather the preparation for the time in the concert when there are long passages of rest and then long passages of intense activity.

    We practice daily the performance of our instrument, what I was asking is “what do you do for practicing entrances after long rests or staying focused in long concerts?”
     
  6. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

    875
    202
    Jul 11, 2010
    Gainesville, FL
    You could try doing exactly what you have to do in concert --
    Usually when we practice parts, I daresay we skip over large rests. No use in practicing them right?
    Well, in this case you may find it useful to play your parts with these long rests back to front, not skipping anything. It'll be even harder to concentrate, I imagine, without anything but the ticking of a metronome, if that. It'd certainly help build concentration

    Cheers
     
  7. fredthewhale

    fredthewhale Pianissimo User

    181
    17
    Jun 12, 2011
    New Jersey
    One thing that's helped me with concentration is a meditation practice.

    I definitely have a "divergent rest counting" syndrome. I've found that a meditation practice has helped me cut down in my inner noise, and have better and longer focus in performance.
     

Share This Page