Dialing things in - You and/or the Hardware

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trickg, Feb 28, 2015.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,306
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Ahhh so you finally admit it... It's not so much about the equipment, but by how we use it. Shrewd of me how I got you to come over to my side. I people here at TM think I make posts that take discussions of track. I bring it around, I bring it around... with the help of Tobylou of course. You may be my editor, but Tobylou keeps me honest.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Big Dub, I know you know that you can lawfully give paints and supplies to G-man (as does not say he couldn't paint something with them, but such may be questionable if then salable), but you most likely would be arrested if you went about a hospital in the ruse and false personation as a physician, and additionally be charged with unlawful entry. The ought of you doing so was good for a laugh though (but not a loud one).
     
  3. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

    4,823
    3,021
    Dec 19, 2009
    Hillsborough, NJ
    Ah, point well taken/
     
  4. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

    4,823
    3,021
    Dec 19, 2009
    Hillsborough, NJ
    Yeah, well, I was on your side all along, boss. And excuse me but I didn't think anyone needed to keep you honest. Isn't that the way you are? Now try to get out of that one, why don't you.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The thread subject is dialing things in and it sure needs to stay in perspective. For players that can't play 10 notes one after another and have them all sound the same, what good is a hardware tweak other than to be pimping cool.

    Dialing hardware in only serves to integrate sound, feel and hearing. It isn't a subject for better range, endurance or a replacement for less practice time. When our chops and body use are dialed in, small things can heighten the playing experience. Even if we practice enough to realize the difference, a change is not necessarily "better". I normally play my Monette Prana3, I wanted to see how close I could get intonation, response and security with my Bach 229H CL. I still have the Bach sound and core, but the horn now plays like a Monette. I just pick it up and play - nothing that I want to change - it just works! The difference is color.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,794
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Hear hear!

    It's frustrating sometimes to see musicians - and it's not limited to trumpet players by a long shot - who try to buy their way into better playing, but it's a very common theme among hobbyist players.

    I had an experience that I thought was interesting because it illustrated that the best gear only gets you so far, and this story isn't even a trumpet story - it's a drumming story.

    One night, just as praise band practice was kicking off and I'd just sat down behind the drums, I saw a young guy I didn't know standing in the rehearsal area, and he was holding a drum stick bag. At the time I was still not too confident in my abilities as a drummer, and I got really nervous - it was clear this guy was a drummer, so I knew he'd be paying attention to everything I was playing. I was using the church's budget level kit for the main drums, but I had my snare and cymbals - they help a drummer to feel at home behind another kit, and I have always used decent gear for that.

    In any case, I really focused on what I was doing, and ended up having a real solid rehearsal performance.

    When we'd run through the tunes, I was introduced to this guy. He and his young wife (who was with him at the time) had been attending services, and he was interested in joining the praise team. We chatted a bit more, found a tune he said he knew, and he sat down behind the kit to show us what he was made of as a drummer.

    Absolutely awful. Couldn't play straight time, and tried to impress by throwing every trick he thought he knew, which unfortunately made it worse due to the fact that he'd push through fills, lose time completely, lose his sense of the '1' and beat in general, etc. It was so bad that the band almost fell apart a couple of times on a song that we played all the time.

    So he gets done with his "tryout" and he now wants to start talking gear. I have a modest kit setup - it's pro level, but it's what some consider "entry level pro" - the best part of my kit has always my cymbals, (mostly Sabian) which are hand-picked, and the fact that I keep my drums tuned up and sounding good. It's a solid, versatile setup, but not overly expensive. Then he tells me about his kit - a huge DW Collector's series kit with a couple of really nice, expensive snare drums and plethora of high end Paiste cymbals - we're talking around $10,000+ worth of gear, not including hardware and cases.

    To me this was proof personified that just because you can, doesn't necessarily mean you should.
     
  7. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

    4,823
    3,021
    Dec 19, 2009
    Hillsborough, NJ
    This is an important question, Patrick: How did you deal with telling him he basically stunk up the joint in a diplomatic, kind way?
    I ask, because it's one of the most difficult things to do in my own experience when you're dealing with amateur volunteers, per se.
     
  8. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

    3,142
    1,945
    Feb 1, 2015
    Cincinnati
    To fire anybody from anything sucks. When I was working as an HVAC apprentice I was told I sucked, I did but I had all the tools. Now I'm in a position in life where I have had to thin the heard. That said think it would break my heart to get fired from music, that is some powerful stuff , but it helps to know
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,794
    3,560
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    BigDub, fortunately it wasn't up to me to tell him - that was up to the praise team leader. Fortunately we had a pretty full roster of players, at least 2 deep on every instrument, and deeper than that for a few, so I think it was simply letting the guy off the hook by telling him that the roster was full, and they'd let him know if he was needed.

    I hear you loud and clear about letting someone go though. I had roommate (drummer) at the armed forces school of music who got failed out and sent off to be a medic. Needs of the army, and all of that. His main failing was that at the time he had some basic cops issues and didn't really play swing. He was absolutely crushed that the Army told him he wasn't good enough, that he wasn't really a drummer. He didn't let it defeat him though. He finished his time in the army, got out, continued to drum, and now he teaches drum kit playing at a musicians collective where he lives.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    All I can say is not many recognized pros could not make most student gear sound fantastic. Patrick, I've a pair of B6 sticks and a decent stage snare on a stand, but I'd need help to even to pound out a decent street beat now and yet I can recognize that beat readily. Just that my feet now can't walk that pace. Still, I usually can still make student brass sing, and to enjoy do not aspire to pay thousands for pro quality.
     

Share This Page