Difference between C and B-Flat books? Beginner Question.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Overtones, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. Overtones

    Overtones New Friend

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    Oct 24, 2010
    Thinking of getting some fake books this year for Christmas.

    The Ultimate Fake Book (for C Instruments)
    **there is also a B-flat version.**
    Amazon.com: The Ultimate Fake Book (for C Instruments) (9780793529391): Hal Leonard Corp.: Books

    The Ultimate Pop/Rock Fake Book: C Edition
    (no B-flat version.)
    http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Pop-...0X/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1322688570&sr=8-10

    Classic Rock Fake Book: Over 250 Great Songs of the Rock Era, Arranged for Piano, Vocal, Guitar, Electronic Keyboard an all 'C' Instruments
    (no B-Flat version)
    Amazon.com: Classic Rock Fake Book: Over 250 Great Songs of the Rock Era, Arranged for Piano, Vocal, Guitar, Electronic Keyboard an all 'C' Instruments (9780793578566): Hal Leonard Corporation: Books

    The Best Fake Book Ever: For Keyboard, Vocal, Guitar, and All "C" Instruments (4th Edition)
    **there is also a B-Flat version**
    http://www.amazon.com/Best-Fake-Boo...43/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1322688570&sr=8-15

    I rather play vocals to songs in their original key even if I do not have the range. I only
    can play up to an A above staff barely. But I rather work up to the range of the vocals
    in the original key then play them in a lower key or different key written for the trumpet and
    other B-Flat instruments. Of course I will still be a tone lower I guess. I don't know.
     
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    crap.....Just read SmoothOperator's post...

    After reading Daves post, I was right. Get the Bb.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Get the C version so the person who is playing guitar with you can read the chords for your favorite songs ;)

    Also don't forget the Chuck Sher standards book, it has the more popular songs in it.
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    If you buy the "C" book, you'll have to transpose everything to play with other instruments (or they will have to). Buy the "Bb" book if you have a Bb horn. Let the guitar player buy a "C" book for himself (or you could buy both the "Bb" and "C" books).
     
  5. Overtones

    Overtones New Friend

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    Oct 24, 2010
    So if I am playing a song from a "B-Flat" book and the song is originally "D" it will be "E"
    to compensate for the trumpets "B-Flat" tuning. I also read in a review that the key
    was changed or lowered for the "B-Flat" instruments making the song sound bad or to low.
    I guess to keep the notes in a certain range. I probably just buy the "C" books.
     
  6. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    Transposing kind of comes with the territory of being a trumpet player... On the other hand I barely expect a guitarist to be able to sight read music fluently, let alone sight transpose.

    Buying both books is probably optimal I guess, but ideally as a trumpet player going from Bb to C should be completely trivial.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  7. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Well, the Bb book should be written higher to be in the correct key with the C instruments. I don't know why someone would write a Bb book lower than the standard key for the piece, unless it's to avoid all the sharps. But it's not really a fake book then...
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    It has never bothered me to sight transpose C music to Bb instrumentation because I learned it that way whereas the C music was the most plentiful at the time.

    Also, to change the original concert key isn't such a big deal either whereas it has often been done by many composers. Conspicuously, I've performed George Handel's Hallelujah Chorus from the Messiah in both the concert key of D and in Eb, the latter as lowers it. I did it only because my wife doesn't favor high notes, but it can also be considered an arranger's dynamic. My comment is that sometimes it works favorably and sometimes it does not. Did anyone notice the concert key change in the movie version of the Sound of Music for the song Edelweiss just so it could be dubbed by Bill Lee as the male vocalist in lieu of Christopher Plummer in the finale. Well, it wasn't in the same key as in the Revised Edition of the vocal selections I have from Williamson Music as marketed by Hal Leonard as is Bb Major (a nice easy transposition to Bb trumpet where there then is no sharps or flats).

    Disclaimer: This Bill Lee is not my late brother or any relative I know of. My late brother was still in USAF when the movie was filmed.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  9. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    QUOTE=Overtones. Overtones, just to summarise:

    So if I am playing a song from a "B-Flat" book and the song is originally "D" it will be "E" to compensate for the trumpets "B-Flat" tuning.
    That is correct. The written music for a Bb instrument is written one full step above the concert pitches.
    - - and the key signature is also one full step up.

    I also read in a review that the key was changed or lowered for the "B-Flat" instruments making the song sound bad or to low.
    I have never experienced that. I would be leery or such a fake book. Which one was that?

    I guess to keep the notes in a certain range. I probably just buy the "C" books.
    I don't believe that you need to worry about the range. Normally popular songs are written in a range from C below the treble staff top line F. Some go down to A below the staff and some to a G above the staff, but pretty much they fall into a range that works - in the transposed range - for your personal playing range. Remember, if you get a C book and learn all of the songs you want to learn in non-transposed keys, then whenever you start playing with others, you are going to have to relearn every one of them in a new key.
     
  10. Overtones

    Overtones New Friend

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    This is the review I read about notes being to low.

    http://www.amazon.com/Best-Fake-Boo...=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1322793662&sr=1-4

    Maybe not that great for trumpet...

    "I'm just getting started playing the trumpet again after a 48 yr. break. I bought this book because of the large number of songs and being written in b flat. True there are a lot of songs that are newer and not so many standard "oldies". However, that's not my main concern. A lot of songs just don't sound that good on the trumpet and some are written with notes so low that they sound terrible. There are some great trumpet pieces such as "When Sunny Gets Blue", "Misty", etc., but you have to wade through a lot of others to get to the good ones. I have some other Leonard fake books for the keyboard and they are just fine but look for some other music for the trumpet."
     

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