Different horns - different mpc's. Why?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Churchman, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. Churchman

    Churchman Mezzo Piano User

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    When I play my Selmer it works great with a Stork mpc - it works real easy too.
    But with a Asymetric it is 'orrible, and harder work somehow (though not as extreme as example 2)

    However, I just can't play my Reynolds 'C' with the Stork, it's such hard work. Not only can I hardly get above the stave - but, it is such hard work - sucking my lungs out it feels!. Whereas, pop in the Asymetric and away it goes. Better sound, and easier to play.

    Anyone know why there are such differences in the difficulty of play of horns with different mpc's? Differences in tone I get, but differences in the ease of playing the horn I don't.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Essentially, we have three interfaces: player, mouthpiece and trumpet. We are used to dividing the trumpet into things like bell flairs, leadpipe, bore and whatever, and these help to define the impedance and resonance of the trumpet. With the mouthpiece we have cup volume, cup shape, backbore and throat defining its own impedance and resonance. Ideally, the mouthpiece and trumpet cooperate with each other and the player.

    Pretty much voodoo stuff--trial and error is the most common way of matching the player to the mouthpiece to the trumpet.
     
  3. jamiepompey

    jamiepompey New Friend

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    Yep, agree with that, trial and error as there are any number of different factors that can minutely affect how an instrument and mouthpiece feel to play. I've never gone wrong with my trusty Bach 3C tho.....
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    All true, but when it comes to different horns-different mouthpieces as the function, the most important variable is the mouthpiece backbore/trumpet leadpipe bore interface. When the amplitude of the sound wave leaving the backbore most efficiently resonates with the bore of the leadpipe, you will achive the most fullest sound... or any varience of sound that is desired. For me, I now strive for a darker sound (off amplitude) as when I was achieving my brightest sound, my band leader did not like this. So I have learned at this phase in my life it is better to please the boss, than the performer. AND the audience seems to like this better.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    By the way, as noted above... trial and error is the only way to optimise the sound you are going for. Then leave that make of mouthpiece with that make of trumpet and don't expect to change unless you want to change the sound.
     
  6. Churchman

    Churchman Mezzo Piano User

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    Ohhh... that 3c - there it goes again! ;-)

    More seriously - thanks. But it seems that the best word is indeed 'voodoo' - though with my background I prefer plain 'weird'! Maybe someone will work it all out one day, but then again, maybe not if you to haven't done so yet!
     
  7. drmctchr

    drmctchr Pianissimo User

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    I keep reading about the necessity of a "trial-and-error" approach to finding a desirable horn - or mouthpiece - or leadpipe - or spit valve ... etc. I want to eventually try out a number of new flugelhorns ... but it will take travels and time to do that ... (I have seen the term "safari" mentioned here). I don't seriously think I will ever be switching leadpipes or bells. But, at the moment, I am willing to shell out a few dollars for a variety of mouthpieces. Therefore, these past few days I have been thinking of ordering a set of 3 or 4 different sizes of one brand ... hoping that these will transition to the next (hopefully better) horn that I will someday buy. The two current flugelhorns are an old F.Besson ("Old Bessie") and a Yamaha 231S ("Old Yammie"). Since I find the mpc size-descriptions so confusing among all of the available companies, I suspect I will order Bach (perhaps 3C, 5C, 7C and 10-1/2C) simply because these are easier to understand than the alphabet soup of so many other brands. But at least it will be a start. Or (to experiment) should I stick with the brand of the horn ...Yamaha? Sure would appreciate some advice. I may end up with a horn brand which is entirely different ... maybe Kanstul ... who knows.

    I wonder ... have other readers here done something similar and now have a set of mpcs that they want to unload? I'll buy.
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Arthur Benade had a good test for matching the mouthpiece to the horn. One plays a number of crescendos on open notes, and plays "neutral," letting the pitch rise or fall as it wants. If the pitch rises, the backbore is too large, if it falls, it is too small. If it says the same, it is just right. Also to be tested is the intonation, and once again, we should play "neutral." Although we may be seeking increased range, a bigger, better sound, more flexibility and whatever else on our list with a new mouthpiece, if it won't play in tune, it is worthless. Have fun searching!
     
  9. drmctchr

    drmctchr Pianissimo User

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    Mr. Vulgano ... Would you give a hint of how you are defining "neutral"? Do you mean "no vibrato"? Thanks.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Neutral as in neither lipping up, nor down during the crescendo but rather permitting the pitch to do what it wants. If we have to lip notes down or up because of varying dynamics, if we have to bend the notes to stay in tune, we tire ourselves out.
     

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