Different lacquer strip

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrassBandMajor, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Well, I know paint stripper or aircraft stripper works but what do you to strip lacquer on a Holton collegiate from 1953 without paint stripper and aircraft stripper?
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I'd tend to think that lacquer thinning or even acetone would do it - a 1953 Holton is going to have real nitrocellulose lacquer on it, and I've had good success stripping lacquer with plain acetone.
     
  3. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Easy-Off in the blue can will work.
     
  4. Clarkvinmazz

    Clarkvinmazz Forte User

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    really really hot water. no, seriously.
     
  5. Newell Post

    Newell Post Piano User

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    Go to the car wash when nobody is around.....
     
  6. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Pour boiling water over it, if this does not work then a more aggressive stripper must be used, Selley's or similar Methyl Chloride based paint stripper or spray on oven cleaner available at supermarket. Wash well after use with hot water and be careful, use outside and do not get either on skin.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  7. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Should get a oven cleaner
     
  8. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    I third the Boiling water. It comes off like a sheet of cellophane. Make sure you have a good sized bucket, and the horn will be very hot, so take care.

    A lot of those Methylene Chrloride/ DCM products are good, but quite a number of people have died using it. I would not recommend it, even with precautions. There is usually a wax added to the mix as well, to trap the solvent in, and force it into the substrate - a good stripper. Seriously, stick to oven cleaner, and follow the directions.

    I have never had to use anything other than boiling water to remove lacquer. Take care to take the valves out, and you do not want to distort the horn, so be careful how you handle it when it is being covered with boiling water. It took me 4 or 5 goes with boiling water to remove it.
     
  9. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Boiling water and finish off with oven cleaner.
     
  10. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Other way around, start with Oven cleaner and finish with boiling water, actually boiling water first, if does not work then oven cleaner and finish with boiling water, after which several washes with cooler water, rub down with a cloth moistened with white vinegar and wash again, dry.

    When all the old lacquer is removed you can start polishing.

    Regards, Stuart.
     

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