Different Styles Of Music

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by xjb0906, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    How difficult do you find it to switch between different styles of music? I am mainly concerned with the character of your sound. Orchestral vs. Big Band vs. traditional Concert Band. I find that I can practice for certain playing styles and do fine. I do run into problems when I have to play different styles in short order. It is like I need an adjustment period to make the change.
     
  2. AaronPlaysTrumpet

    AaronPlaysTrumpet New Friend

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    In my experiences, the key to switching styles is to first establish a "neutralized mode" of playing. You're not playing jazz, orchestral, etc. You're just playing the trumpet - making a good trumpet sound, playing in tune, regardless of style. Establish this whenever you warm up and whenever you warm down. You'll know you've found this neutralized setting when you feel the most relaxed as you play. When you experience that moment where everything is working just right with minimal effort, it feels like something "just clicks". Savor that feeling and work to feel that way all the time. Stylistic nuances are built on top of that.
     
  3. LiquidSean

    LiquidSean Pianissimo User

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    I'd have to agree with Aaron on this one. No matter what you're playing, you need to have a full tone, which requires proper air support. Once that is established, it takes nothing more than some changes in articulation/stylization, and the arrangement you're playing should do the rest of the work.

    Typically though, and I might get flamed for this, but using the right tools for the job helps me out. As in, if I want a zingy bright big band sound, I'm not going to be playing on the Schilke 24. :D
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    It is kind of like breathing in and breathing out. When you don't think about it, you do it well.
     
  5. chenzo

    chenzo Piano User

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    Once you comfortable with the music the rest will fall in to place ...if you listen to whats happening around you
    and be aware of what you are doing and what are you trying to output
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I like to compare styles to moods. When I am sad, I cry, happy-laugh, angry-frown, challenged-decisive, frustrated-wild,........

    When your trumpet vocabulary is big enough, the rest is easy.

    If you are having trouble switching, you are missing some "words". For most players this means looking for opportunities to become more at home with a particular style.
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I was concerned about limiting my playing awhile back and found as long as I can hear the style and the sound I want to produce the rest of it seems to take care of itself.
    One of the things that can really "make the sound" is your vibratto. So I agree with the neutral comment concerning that.
    The equipment comment is certainly valid ..but you have to hear what you are trying to do.
     
  8. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Thanks for all of the answers thus far. Do you find that it takes some time to get more familiar with a different style after playing another? I am guessing that one will become better at switching more quickly with experience. I sometimes feel like I am doing last minute cramming for a test.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    No, you just play the meaning of the ink. Of course you need to prepare, but there are 24 hours in a day for that.
     
  10. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    If you are struggling with the parts technically then it can make it more of a challenge to "make music". I like how Rowuk puts it ... in the mood.
     

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