Dilemma

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by horner, Dec 18, 2010.

  1. horner

    horner Pianissimo User

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    Jul 19, 2008
    London, England
    Hi all,

    I am experiencing somewhat of a moral problem here. I have been playing on a student jupiter for many years now and it has done me fine, sounds good in all registers, can get up to Double High C on occassion and it has good valves and a tone which i like even if it is not a 'classic' sound. However, i had mentioned that i was thinking of looking for an upgrade to a professional model when i graduate university to try out some top quality instruments, and see if there are any which i like better. My parents decided that for my 21st birthday, without my knowledge or input and having never blown the horn, they would buy me a Yamaha 2335, which is also a student model trumpet.

    Here is my dilemma, i can see no advantage in moving out of my comfort zone for another student model and while i havent played the 'new' (my mum said it was used and the scratches testify to it) trumpet properly yet, the first impression of the Yamaha is not good with sluggish valves and an unpleasant (to my ears anyway) tone once playing above High C.

    Basically, is there anyway in which i can protect my parents feelings yet keep playing my old trumpet until i am ready to find a new one myself. I had no input in this and did not even know about it until this morning.
    I fell guilty but on the other hand, for parents who are themselves brass instrument players, my dad having been a professional french horn player, they should have known better than to buy it without me trying it.

    Please give me some advice :-(

    (p.s. i was studying in the US for the last 4 months, my birthday was on 15th Nov, got given the instrument today/18th Dec when i returned to England)

    (p.p.s, i do not want to sound ungrateful, i am not ungrateful and i am not just whining about it, i really do not know what the best thing is to do)
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2010
  2. Bflatman

    Bflatman Forte User

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    Manchester, England
    What you could try is thank them for their present, Im sure you have already, and play on the yam in front of them for a lot, then after a few months approach them and say that you like both the yam and the jupiter, but your skills and abilities have moved on and you now need a pro grade or a good intermediate instrument.

    You could even say that you think the yam helped you to progress, that will make them feel better.

    You can ask them for their help trading both instruments up, and finding a good progression horn.

    I think that as musicians they will understand that your needs have changed, and hey who knew it would happen just after they got your present.

    hope that helps.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Clarksburg, WV
    I see this as a situation of "this or that", right?
    Why not think "Both"!
    You now have two horns. You can play on the one you're use to (beacuse you don't want to loose any ground with your current abilities) and sloowly break in the other horn at your leasure. You're a luck person. Now you have two horns. Your main horn and a back up horn. Isn't life a little better now? Sometimes its all in how we precieve things.
    Most (if not all) serious trumpet players have more than one horn.

    Of course you could save up and get one. It'll take a couple of years but with Ebay and the ability to get a used pro horn at a greatly reduced price allows you the oppportunity to achieve your goal of a pro horn.
    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2010
  4. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

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    Parents are easily fooled. Swap it for one you like that is the same colour and they won't even notice the difference.:evil:
     
  5. Asher S

    Asher S Pianissimo User

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    Sep 20, 2009
    Suburban Boston
    As a parent, I think I would prefer an honest (and respectful) approach. Tell them how much you appreciate their support, and just explain to them that their very thoughtful gift is not quite right for you, and that you really need to play a bunch of different horns in the store to make sure you get one that fits you. It's really no different that if they bought you a nice suit that just didn't fit correctly. Do you think they would expect you to wear it???
     
  6. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    dubuque iowa
    I agree with Asher s. Honesty is always the best policy. It sounds to me by your question that you already have figured out how to aproach them without hurting their feelings. As musicians themselves they surely will understand that the Yamaha may not fit you and a trade in is in order. Good luck and dont frett about talking to them about your concern, they will understand.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Have the Yamaha cut down to make it a C trumpet. It may then have a greater chance of being played.
     
  8. horner

    horner Pianissimo User

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    Jul 19, 2008
    London, England
    Thank you all for your replies, all were very helpful,

    I did thank them for the present, i was really shocked when i opened the present and i know i am very lucky, both to have such thoughtful parents and to now have two trumpets!

    I think i will try the yamaha for a while and see if i can get on with it a bit better and if not think of a polite way of telling them. The C trumpet was an interesting idea, how expensive is such a procedure? The problem with trading the two in is that i have a huge attachment to my Jupiter so i wouldnt want to trade it away.

    Thanks again for all your input, it was a great help!
    :)
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I like Rowuk's advice.
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Oregon

    Sorry, guys, if this is a little off topic ..... but, can any trumpet be "cut down to make it a C trumpet"? What happens to the intonation? And who does this?

    I have an excess of Bb trumpets ..... That sounds like a great alternative to buying a C trumpet. I'll just line them all up and see who steps forward for the operation.:-) (no way am I doing that to the Severinsen)

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010

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