Directing the air stream

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by wnaus, Dec 29, 2008.

  1. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Dec 4, 2008
    I would like to share a technique with you that if you can capture the"feel" of it, will help to cure many of the problems commonly associated with playing the trumpet. I'm talking about directing the air stream. When the air stream enters the mouthpiece cup, it can do one of three things. Hit high before it enters the aperture. Hit low before it enters or it can more effectively be directed directly to the center of the cup where it enters directly into the aperture. This approach will improve your sound(top to bottom),range,flexibility and endurance. I'm sure this is the approach Wayne Bergeron takes. Wayne if I'm wrong my apologies! David Monette has said that this is how you should play his mouthpieces. Anyway good luck,this really works.
    By the way, does anyone know that the trumpet was mentioned 64 times in the bible! It must be Gods instrument and I feel privileged to play it.
    One more thing. When I first met Dizzy Gillespie I said Hello Dizzy,my name is WN and I also play trumpet. He looked at my lips and said,"I know ,you have the mark of distinction"!
    Practice on!!!!!!
    Wayne Naus
    Welcome to Wayne Naus' World
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  2. Hoghorn

    Hoghorn Pianissimo User

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    Yes this DOES work !!

    Hoghorn
     
  3. rviser

    rviser Pianissimo User

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    Dec 26, 2008
    This is pretty much the basic description of the Pivot Method right?
     
  4. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Dec 4, 2008
    Don Reinhardt from Philadelphia(who I had the honor of studying with)made his fame on the "Pivot" system. You can google him for more info. This is not exactly what I am talking about although it is about being aware of your pivot which is responsible for directing your air stream and where is hits on the inside of your mouthpiece. The most optimum air stream hits the exact center of your mouthpiece which focuses the air directly into the aperture.
    Wayne Naus
     
  5. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Dec 4, 2008
    The best way to "feel" this concept is to create a 90 degree angle between your mouthpiece and teeth. In other words picture two 90 degree angles one between your mouthpiece or lead pipe and your upper teeth and also one with your lower teeth. This will automatically align your top and bottom front teeth so they are even. This may not be possible for everyone to do depending on your jaw and teeth alignment. Watch any good player like Doc, Maurice Andre, Wayne Bergeron, Arturo, Maynard and you will see the angles I'm talking about. Also notice with these players how they tuck in their chin when they play. This creates an open throat, as opposed with a closed throat, which is is one of the most common problems associate with getting a good sound, range and flexibility.Watch the three Tenors in concert to see what it sounds and looks like to play, or in this case sing, with an open throat.
    Wayne Naus
     
  6. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    Mar 1, 2007
    Hi Wayne,

    A few questions:

    I can understand centering the air stream. Looking at the photos on your website it appears you have a 2/3 top lip, 1/3 bottom lip presentation in the mouthpiece, correct?

    If you play for Red Sox games, where are you located? I"m on the seacoast of NH.

    Thirdly, I've just recently picked up on the "open throat" approach, and it's amazing how much of a difference it makes. If I close up the sound is "pinched".

    Anyway, thanks a ton for the posts.

    From a "comeback" player.

    Steve
     
  7. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Dec 4, 2008
    The mouthpiece placement is a result of your natural embrochure condition which you cannot do much about. It is going to be what it is regardless of what ever you do. Eventually your embrochure will find its own natural position whether its 2/3 on top or 1/3 on bottom or whatever. It is hard or impossible to change this once you established it. To answer your question, I'm in Boston and am fortunate to occasionally be invited to perform the National Anthem for Red Sox and Bruins games. you can hear the version I play on my web site at Welcome to Wayne Naus' World.
    WN
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I disagree. Pointing your airstream anywhere is of no techical advantage. This is a myth that just will not go away. Why? Because sound production is an alternating current event, not a direct current. Even if you pointed your air directly at the throat of the mouthpiece, you are expelling air faster than it can pass through the mouthpiece. It backs up, increases pressure and actually supports the lips.

    Something does change however when you move the mouthpiece or your tongue around. In the first case, the proportion to upper and lower lip changes, most always with no advantage in range or tone. Moving the tongue can change the consistency of the airflow - that can change a lot in our playing. Without a good teacher fooling around with the tongue position generally leads to nowhere.

    I would not make any assumptions about why great players are successful - especially when it comes to embouchure. Most of the time they are as good as they are because they just practiced with what they had and did not waste time on fantasy. They were not looking for a short cut - they just worked harder than those with lesser success!

    Dave Monette has never said that his mouthpieces should be played this way. I have been one of his clients for more than 10 years and have 10 or 12 various sizes and weights of his mouthpieces. His mouthpieces do allow successful playing without pivoting. This has nothing to do with pointing your air at the throat however, it simply means that the geometry of playing can be consistent allowing the playing to be the same!
     
  9. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Dec 4, 2008
    With all due respect, this is my response to your response. First of all, what is an alternating current event? This is not a "Myth" and I never heard it referred to as one. I never mentioned anything about the tongue or it supporting the lips, whatever that means. What I am talking about is no fantasy, it is fact. I did not imply that this is a short cut to trumpet playing. As far as assumptions about great players, I feel I am somewhat qualified to make observations about great players based on my years of playing,touring and recording with great players(see my website,www.waynenaus.com).I disrespect you referring to my post as "fantasy". Who are you anyway. Where can I hear your recordings and who have you played with? Before you make any claims concerning trumpet technique on a site like this one you better have some credentials.What are they? Dave Monette said to me back in the 1980's when he was first getting started that this was the correct way of playing his mouthpieces. You are certainly entitled to your opinion but how do you back it up?
    Wayne Naus
     
  10. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    Mar 1, 2007
    This is why I love this forum.......
     

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