Distracted Chet Baker

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Big Daddy, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. Big Daddy

    Big Daddy Mezzo Piano User

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    I agree however I think it's a little busy in parts while Chet is singing.
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I think he handled the feedback issue fine. There's nothing more frustrating than someone on the board who can't run it correctly. The guitar playing was a little heavy-handed for an accompaniment, but maybe he was turned up too loud. It pains me every time I see Chet in later life...what a waste of a great talent to screw it up with drugs.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The comment was in my mind directed toward the sound man. And as a leader, I think Chet handled it as professionally as possible. He made a short intervention requesting to leave things alone, then walked away to help prevent interference from his mic, and continued the song as if there was no prior problem.

    I hear the guitar player having a conversation with Chet, and at times he may have been providing a little call and response (Chet at times did respond) and I don't look at this as overshadowing. I also agree, nice guitar playing.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I also recall a time when I heard John Klemmer develop squeals in the monitor, where he stopped playing, went into a rant about his sound man, then apologized to the audience. I am not sure his apology recovered the mood he lost with his audience.

    I was also at a Buddy Rich concert when his sound man did not achieve the balance Buddy wanted. Buddy, without warning, threw his stick at the sound man (that was set up midway back in the audience), missed the sound man and struck someone in the crowd. My respect for Buddy Rich was lost in this one moment.

    Chet was very professional in this clip and as a result the quality of the performance was maintained and the crowd truly appreciated the end result.
     
  5. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    The sound guys have all these faders and buttons talking to them "move me move me" ... always pushing it to the edge ...like trumpet players and high notes I guess
     
  6. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Speaking as the Dad of arguably "the best soundman in the world" ;-), a professionally trained sound engineer will NOT arbitrarily change the settings and 'the desk' shouldn't be on the edge at all - the 'soundy' is there to get the artist to the audience efficiently and musically, and to keep the balance. The issue is the difference between the artist's idea of what the sound should be - and the soundman's perspective from front of house. Yes, sometimes the soundman is a dork - sometimes the artist hasn't a clue - they need to i. talk, and ii. listen. Both CAN be professional, and the audience will be the winners.
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Right there with you Ted... key phrase was"professionally trained"
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I speak with the certain knowledge of someone who has a relative with both professional sound engineer qualifications and is a competent tuba player.

    He has suffered my life-long ministrations of "turn that down - are you deaf?" and he has developed an ecclectic and enviable taste in music (ie just like mine mine really), and he believes that the tuba, or the baseline, is the velvet cushion upon which the band sits.

    I like the way he 'mixes' because he shows consideration firstly for the listener and secondly for the musician - and he reckons it is important to have it in that order - but he is NOT a failed musician with a penchant for audio equipment, he is a competent musician (although sadly not a trumpeter). He is a professionally trained Live Sound Production Engineer, with a knowledge of high quality audio gear. He has also won numerous sound quality competitions for car audio installations (current project is a brand new Maseratti - the car has yet to be delivered to the customer - Maseratti Australia has retained him for his expertise, and prior to initial delivery of the car).

    So, bottom line - vicariously I must be a sound expert. ;-)
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2011

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