DIY Trumpet Teaching

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bamajazzlady, Aug 13, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I am a strong advocate of personal relationships. A trumpet teacher can be much more than a practice monitor. They are usually the ones that take their best students along to gigs which in turn give the student more practical experience with better players.

    ANYTHING is possible. Getting others involved increases the PROBABILITY!
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Nicely stated Robin - you are without a doubt 100% correct regarding the relationships. In my own experience, I've had very little formal instruction, but I have loads of relationship experience. I've been privileged to know and gig with a lot of first rate players who impart their wisdom to me along the way, and they have opened doors for me to play and gig, both alongside of them, and in place of them for gigs they are unable to commit to. Knowing people like that and getting to play with them is an amazing resource for anyone who can open their ears and minds to what it's being placed before them on the table.
     
  3. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    What a great idea. I wonder if Alison Balsam would like to have a personal relationship? :roll:
     
  4. Masterwannabe

    Masterwannabe Mezzo Piano User

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    +1

    I would think that you could find a number of players here on this site that might be capable of providing on-line lessons/help. I am a comeback player and as such do a lot of DIY but I had many years of private lessons long ago so I do have a good solid base to start from. I do occasionally take a lesson or clinic when I can afford it and the things I have learned/re-learned are invaluable.

    Ray Z
    ___________________________________________________
    If you don't know where you are going it doesn't matter how you get there.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Alison does have a personal relationship with her mentors, husband and students - probably in that order.........

    You only get to be her student when others are convinced that the relationship will make sense - not babies.
     
  6. kctrumpeteer

    kctrumpeteer Piano User

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    I think some good beginner books with play along CDs can be helpful to get you back in the mode of playing. I haven't tried them before but have heard ok things about the "smart music" books. I heard there were setups where you could get a fairly inexpensive microphone to connect to your computer and then the software with the mic helps tell you if you are playing the right notes, etc. Sounds pretty cool, but you should train your ear and use a piano to know that you are hitting the right notes.

    With all that said, I know that soon after picking up my trumpet and signing up for lessons as a comeback player that my first instructor I worked with correctly resolved an issue with how I was tonguing/playing and nipped a bad practice in the butt before it became a bad habit. Fast forward 2 years and last night I had a trumpet lesson with a local professional trumpet player. In one lesson there are 2 - 3 things that he basically fixed that I have been doing wrong. A lot of the problems are probably subtle, but that is what you get when using a good instructor. So you may or not be aware of things that you are doing wrong, but in my case I was aware of the effect, but not the cause... or specifically how to correct the issue.

    I may start seeing that guy once a month for tweaking my playing and that is my recommendation with DIY vs teachers, etc. is find ways to play music with other people whether in a ensemble or in lessons, or in a band... Even if you don't use an instructor, you will get feedback on your playing immediately when others are listening.
     
  7. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    There is an adage that a lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client.

    There is also often warning against "the inmates running the asylum".

    In learning music there needs to be a mentor, an exemplar, an inspirer, an instructor. You can't be all of those yourself; you do not have the perspective.
     
    Vulgano Brother likes this.
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Agreed, but a person can get those things without taking formal lessons provided they place themselves in an environment where they can learn through observation and listening, and they have more experienced folks around who are willing to give some pointers here and there.

    I don't want to sound like I don't value the concept of formal lessons in a structured environment, but a person doesn't have to look very far before they find amazing musicians who only had a smattering of formal training (if any) and went on to become accomplished performers.
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Yes but what we probably miss today is the long hours on trains and the like, travelling between gigs, where music, musicianship, equipment, and techniqued is analyased and demonstrated and practiced - over time. These "old-time" musoes had "time" at their disposal in the company of master musicians - we have to pay for that by the 1/2 hour - woe is us.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    It's definitely a different world now. Also, keep in mind that there are a lot of different levels where a person can be and still be a functional musician. By all means, if you want to go pro, you are going to need some serious instruction along the way. Even then there is no guarantee - the lessons and formal training are only a part of it for those wishing to have professional careers as players. For the rest of us who are content to play for our own enjoyment or to moonlight and make some bucks on the side, really, how "good" does one have to be for that, and is it necessary to take lessons in order to do that? Nah - I don't think so. Take my wedding band for instance - only about half of us have any kind of formal training at all, but we still gig and make a nice little moonlighting income. None of us are bucking to go pro either - we're pretty content where we are.
     

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