Do you have to sit straight up to play trumpet correctly?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Haste2, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. Haste2

    Haste2 Piano User

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    Um, yeah. I have pectus excavatum. Just wondering if leaning back slightly might be better for some players. Often it feels like I get the chest-expanding breathing when I'm sitting back on a chair, casually. Maybe it's only because I'm most relaxed in such situations? I always assumed I had to sit perfectly straight while playing, though. Or maybe there are multiple ways you can sit to open up your airways?
     
  2. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

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    I'm sure I'll be torn apart for this, but.

    Studies show that you want to keep the angle between your torso and legs as large as possible when seated as it reduces the strain on your back muscles and decreases disk movement.

    Sitting as much as we do is completely unnatural though, stand whilst you play the trumpet as much as you can, your breathing and back will love you for it!
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Also depends on girth. If portly and sitting down, this would put more constraint on the diaphragm.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Do you have reference to those studies. It is my impression that sitting up straight should be fine and should not really effect the alpha angle between your lips and trumpet which is the real angle that matters. Rowuk, could we have a clarification here?
     
  5. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

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    Certainly!

    Here's an article from the BBC directly concerning it

    BBC News - Sitting straight 'bad for backs'

    If you also look at studies done on kneeling chairs (which open up the angle between your torso and legs), they range from suggesting negligible effect to suggesting it may benefit your back. If you go on the Wiki page for these chairs ( Kneeling chair - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ), you can get links to the studies in the references at the bottom.

    The angle between your lips and the trumpet doesn't need to be affected by your seating position, simply sitting further forwards in the chair works for me (I use an adjustable office chair set to its maximum height). My back is still at a right angle to the floor, but the angle between my torso and my legs is about 100-110 degrees (not quite optimum, but still better according to my research).
     
  6. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    I am not a “Sit down” player at all, I’ve never liked sitting when playing, especially playing lead, due to breathing correctly. If I have to sit to play I have to be on the edge of the chair sitting straight up with one leg under me and the other leg out in front of me. Even then I feel like my breathing and compression are constricted as compared to standing. I have a wooden bar stool that I have cut down the legs a little and use this whenever possible for sitting down. It puts me up higher and lets me compress easier. I also teach my students to do their practicing standing for better compression.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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  8. jtpowell

    jtpowell Pianissimo User

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  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    NO! He doesn't have his leg propped up on the arm. He's too tense! :cool:
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Where will we find the validated ergonomic physiologic treatise on sitting as inducement to task performance? IMO, what works for one will be the anathema of another. Would there be a significant difference in my trumpet performance were I to lay on the floor to play? To this question, my immediate answer is yes, because I'd find it difficult to see my music. Still, there are available technological systems that would make even this feasible. Otherwise, I don't think there would be an issue with my playing (that isn't present in whatever position I am in.) However, with my health issues, my main problem would be standing up again. Actually, to play my favored placement is on a backless high stool where my feet can still feet still touch the floor. (Actually my stool does have a back, but I seldom lean against it unless resting.)
     

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