Do you really want to hear me?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by codyb226, Feb 7, 2012.

Hear me play?

Poll closed Feb 11, 2012.
  1. Yes

    75.0%
  2. No

    25.0%
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. giuseppepepperoni

    giuseppepepperoni New Friend

    12
    5
    Jan 19, 2012
    S Jersey
    My opinion (which doesn't count) is that 14 year-olds should spend more time with their instructors learning properly and less time posting on forums.

    Ask your instructor what you should do. Or ask your parents. Don't ask those of us who don't know you, except by the multitude of your usually useless posts.
     
    codyb226 likes this.
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

    2,660
    354
    Mar 9, 2011
    Florida, US
    Your opinion will always count! Dont think that it wont.
    Me too. 14 is WAY to young to be on a forum like this and have a lot of posts. Even if they knew as much about trumpets as I do. Glad I am not 14!
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  3. rufflicks

    rufflicks Pianissimo User

    169
    135
    Dec 9, 2009
    Nor Cal
    Wow this became oddly complex didn't it? So what you really need to do is record yourself periodically throughout your learning process. Being the computer offers a fantastic way to record, (phone may as well) use this tool. Record then play back, you have ears use them. You know what sucked so start there and fix the worst first. (Ah yes the worst first)

    If you have done this over several weeks and you feel you are playing the piece as good as you possibly can find a professional or college level players recording and compare yours to theirs.

    It is not to beat yourself up it is to help you understand what you sound like and where you truly are as a player.

    This guy flies on this version.
    Marco Pierobon (solo Trumpet) Concert Study (Goedicke) - YouTube

    I think it is a bit fast and looses some of the drama that the piece can conjure up. Not a perfect performance but it sets a bar for speed. (Note the end)

    Here we go this is a nice take on the piece. (Start at 4:46 in)
    Romain Leleu Journal Télévisé de France 2 - YouTube

    I also think this is a bit hurried. It is a fine performance. I just miss the arrogance in all the hurrying.

    The most common flaw I hear in many of the student recordings is a fast tempo at the top that cannot be sustained through the double-tongued section. If your double tongue is not there yet throttle back. Make this piece yours and play it musically. Know and start at a tempo you can sustain, play musically and shape the phrases. I feel like the deliberate march like full of national pride nature is lost in many of the interpretations. This piece proclaims and almost pounds its fist. Now that is just me but, it sure isn’t French. If you have ever drunk with a Russian you might get this piece just a bit more. (Yes the lecture on some inane point… it’s Russian all right)

    Jon
     
    codyb226 likes this.
  4. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

    2,660
    354
    Mar 9, 2011
    Florida, US
    Sure did...

    I did record myself in the first few weeks of playing this piece. And boy, what an improvement.

    Yes, that is what is with me too. I am taking it at 104-108. Still the right tempo but on the slower side. I can play it very cleanly like this because I can not double tongue. I have been working on it for a loooonggg time too. About 3 months.
    Thanks for the comments Jon!
     
  5. CHAMP

    CHAMP Piano User

    407
    20
    Nov 16, 2005
    you're a flippin' idiot. you're the problem with TM, not the moderators, and pros and trumpet players who actually play...

    i'm gonna go work out my buccinators...
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,409
    7,531
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Well, while your doing that, I'm gonna practice!
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,300
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Cannot dissagree with this analysis, but should we be Russian into such an analysis at this point in the thread?
     
  8. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Wow to the Wynton interview. As an educator of 35 years, he has about hit it on the head-but in a rather blunt manner. Still, as educators, there are productive ways to talk to students that fosters improvement. If someone told me," you stink, worse playing is have ever heard, absolute crap" I'm not sure how motivated I would be to continue unless it was to "disprove" and "get even" with the commenter (which actually happened in my academic career-but that is a tale for another time). However, if told, your intonation needs work and here is what will help -then that is a bit more helpful. Guess I am saying a good teacher looks to move the studen tforward from where they are at without being terribly insulting. There is a difference in being honest, providing constructive criticism and being just plain mean and rude. I do worry about many (not all) of the newer generations. They have a tendency to need continued praise and always see themselves as "the best" when, in real comparision, they are often not even up to the average. But what else can we expect from the way they have been raised. When I was in 10th grade the only recognitions I had ever received anywhee were a Bible for confirmation class (United Methodist) and 4 metals for all state. My own son, who is in 10th grade has a wall full of trophys, academic ribbons, plaques, medalions and his uniform is so loaded with metals I can't see how he stands up. Actually,not saying he doesn't diserve a few, he doesn't play as well as I did at his age.

    By the way Cody, if you are reading this, NONE of it directed at you. You are fine.
     
    codyb226 likes this.
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,127
    9,300
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    The youth today come from the T-ball generation were "there are no loosers". When I played D and C ball, there were winners and loosers, and extra innings if one HAD to be decided. Our coaches busted our chops to be a winning team. Where is the motivation for this when there are no winners and loosers? Fact of real life... there are winners and loosers. Winners get the gigs. Loosers don't. The problem is, all us old farts are working with a T-ball generation.
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,409
    7,531
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    My wife and I taught our boys there are winners and losers from the start. When we did summer swim meets, they would not take the light blue or pink participation ribbons. In BBall games where no "score" was taken, only the nitwit parents "didn't know" the score. Our boys played their guts out cause they wanted to win! If you ever work with my boys, you'll be working with winners (yeah I'm proud!)!!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page