Do you remember this Vacchiano student?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bugleboy21, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. Bugleboy21

    Bugleboy21 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 23, 2005
    Fort Eustis, VA
    Greetings Mr. Laureano!

    My trumpet teacher through college, starting in 1994, was Jack Laumer. He was a Manhattan S. of M. grad student with Vacchiano in the late 60's/early 70's. As a matter of fact, he was in the finals with Mr. Schlueter for the job in Minnesota that you now hold. I remember him saying once that he met you briefly during his studies in NY. Is it true that you had set out to be a soloist rather than an orchestral trumpeter when you first started school? I would love to hear stories about your 'adventures' with Mr. Vacchiano. Especially since after working through so many orchestral works during my studies, I remember coming across not-so-frequently played pieces and Mr. Laumer would say, "Lemme see what Vacchiano wrote about this excerpt..." and pull out an excerpt book with Mr. Vacchiano's markings right there! He, more often than not, copied them straight into my book! Mr. Laumer has some fantastic stories about his time with Mr. Vacchiano and I would love to hear more from you! Take care and thank you for the inspiration you've given us!
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    Sergeant,

    First and foremost, thank you for your service. I appreciate as an American that never served in the military.

    Second, I just came home from a late gig and can't address your question as completely as I would like to. Please allow me to do so tomorrow and I'll have some better stuff to write for you.

    However, I will say that Jack Laumer was a profound influence on my carreer and I wouldn't be here without him. More, later.

    ML
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sergeant,

    Jack Laumer was a teacher of mine at the High School of Music and Art, a specialized school in NYC. He was sort of breaking in at the time and directed band, helped with the brass, and various things. He was a partner in teaching to Sid Baker who was also teaching at the time. Sid was my band director and the former principal trumpeter of the Chicago Symphony before Bud! His name at the time was Sidney Beckerman.

    Jack was the first Vacchiano student that I knew that was a more or less fresh out of his studio. Therefore, the concepts he worked on with Vacchiano were very fresh in his playing.

    When I listened to Jack play I noticed how much the air was out almost in front of the tongue. It was a bit of a revelation to me to hear him play as I was very influenced by the recordings of Rafael Mendez and I was into the "popping' style of attack. This truly was my first exposure to a more orchestral style of playing, more of a specialized way of playing. I went home and imitated what I heard and enjoyed this "new" way of approaching the horn.

    Jack was also the gentleman who lent me the piccolo trumpet, a silver Selmer, to use on the Brandenburg I ultimately auditioned with to get into Juilliard.

    As far as my being a soloist :

    I wasn't so much interested in a solo career as I was just playing Mendez solos all the time. I had already been accepted to Juilliard when Jack asked me what I wanted to do with the trumpet. I told him I wanted to play like Rafael Mendez (wherever that led me). He smiled a bit and said "Well, Vacchiano isn't going to teach you to play like Mendez." I was taken aback and wondered why on earth wouldn't he? After all, Mendez was the greatest trumpeter in the world. What else could there be?

    When I got to the school, my first lesson with the Old Man consisted of arpeggios, scales, transpositons, and other fundamental material. At the end I told him I wanted to play one of the Vassily Brandt Concertpieces for him. I said it would be fine and I launched into it. He just about threw a fit when I went into my fast vibrato and poor phrasing. He showed me how to shade away from the end of a phrase, made me play with no vibrato, and slowed my tempi way down and clean up technical passages. In short, I was about to learn some real discipline, thank G-d.

    For my first three or four months I played with no vibrato and played many notes with false fingerings. High A with second valve, high G with one and two, for example. When I went back to the normal fingerings it was like getting zapped by a jolt of electricity to hear those notes in their usual intonation.

    He asked me to go get a D trumpet and I learned transpositions necessary to play Mahler and Bruckner symphonies on the D. It was a marvelous way of looking at the repertoire. Use the horn that makes it easiest and never be afraid of a transposition.

    Well, Sergeant, that's a peek, anyway, into my life for the first few years at school and our mutual friend, Jack.

    ML
     
  4. Bugleboy21

    Bugleboy21 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 23, 2005
    Fort Eustis, VA
    La Macarena...in Minnesota?

    I heard a young European virtuoso who had a love for Mendez. He played a couple solos on rotary Bb...very strange, but wonderful! I'm glad to hear that there are still top chairs using the Selmer pic. I prefer the Selmer's more diffuse and warmer sound to the brash and bright Schilke/Yamaha. I didn't see alot of trumpeters at auditions pulling one of those out. So, after I finish my commitment to the Army and hit the audition scece again, I will pull it out with more confidence. (please do not take the opportunity to insert a joke there!) LOL :)

    Jack also said once that in preparing for the Minnesota job, Mr. Vacchiano told him to remember to learn all the concerto excerpts, since those 'small town' orchestras like to play them alot! LOL Is that true? Thanks for replying and sharing.

    Larry
     
  5. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    Jun 4, 2005
    Teaneck, NJ
    Sid Baker

    Mr. Laureano,

    I was so gassed to hear you mention Sid Baker. I was playing a club date (casual for you midwesterners) in Westchester, and on a break I was grabbing something to eat. A little old guy came up to me and said "Kid, I like the way you play. You sound nice." I thanked him and asked him if he was a trumpet player. He said, " yeah, I used to play." OK, so now I am curious, and ask him where. "Well, I used to play in Chicago, at the Symphony.' Holy Cow! He told me his name was Sid Baker, but his original name was Sid Beckerman. I knew a Sid Beckerman who was a klezmer clarinet player. Turns out it was his cousin, and his uncle was a very famous klezmer clarinetist Shloimke Beckerman, who was a well known Klezmer and theater musician in the 1920's. So I said...you were there before Bud? He explained that he was there as a very young man in 1941, but then went into the army. When he got back, he came to NYC.
    There are very few guys around who remember the old days, so it was fascinating speaking with him. When he mentioned the Goldman Band, I told him I studied with Doug Hedwig. Well, Baker just lit up. It was a lovely time. By the way, he became an observant Jew and was studying to be a cantor at a big synagogue in NYC. I used to see him from time to time after that. I havent seen him in a while.
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Yes, all that's correct. I got to correspond briefly with Mr. Baker a couple of years ago and he related those things you mentioned to me. He recorded Zarathustra with Rodzinski and I don't know if it's out of print but it would be from the 1940's if you can find it, as Bud got the job in '48.

    I remember Doug very well too. Very good guy and a fine player. I last saw him in England at an ITG gathering.

    ML
     
  7. tromj

    tromj Piano User

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    Jun 4, 2005
    Teaneck, NJ
    Doug Hedwig

    Doug always had great things to say about you as well.
    One of the things Doug impressed on me was the heritage of great trumpeters. The story of meeting Sid Baker reminded me of the opportunites we had even into the 1980's of meeting some of the great masters of the old days. Only Vacchiano is left of the old NY school that included Blank, Truetel, Karpilovsky, etc.
    I am 42, so there are a lot of guys I just missed meeting.
     
  8. gms979

    gms979 New Friend

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    Jun 3, 2005
    Hi Mr. Laureano,

    Could you explain more what you mean by false fingerings, like playing an A using 2nd valve? I didn't realize you could do this (only thought that you could play it using just the third valve as an alternate). Or is this a different concept altogether, unrelated to using alternates for lip slurs, etc? Are you just bending a B way down?

    Also, has your experience shown that it is acceptable to stray from using a C for excerpts besides using Picc for Baroque and 20th century music. I did realize that Mr. V. has a reputation of being a smaller horn advocate, but I was interested to hear that he had you doing heavier Bruckner/Mahler stuff on D. For me, doing the Ballerina Dance on Eb and the Ravel Piano Concerto on D is INFINITELY easier than on C. But I'm hesitant to do this in an audition down the road, even though I sound much better on the smaller horns. Makes me think I should work as hard to sound as good on the C in case any panelists would pre-judge me based on what horn I use. I know this is an endless debate and you've probably talked about it elsewhere.....but if you have any opinions or could steer me in the right direction, I'd be grateful!


    Thanks for all you do - I recently joined TM, and am really enjoying things over here. Have hardly posted, but am beginning to get my feet wet! You do a great service!


    Later on,
    Greg
     
  9. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Greg,

    Using the 2nd valve on high A is a very useful little trick that makes some licks easier. Here's another fun one: try Trumpet Voluntary statring on a middle D. Tricky e to f# trill... hard trill, you say? Yes, if you play the f# 2nd valve. But if you try it with 2/3 instead... voila! It works well and quite a bit more easily. Here's another: you're playing the "entrance to something or other that ends with a sustained trill from Eb to F natural. Oh, oh... no sweat! Stick your 3rd slide out and finger 2 to 2/3! It's a good help.

    I've got a million of 'em.

    ML
     
  10. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    Mar 7, 2005
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    There's false fingerings all over the place if you understand the nature of valved instrument. Basically, you move down 1/2 step (relatively) for each piece of tubing you add via the valves. So if you start open, then you've got the following pattern: 0-2-1-12-23-13-123. Those seven positions will ALWAYS follow each other. If you can play Ab 23, then you can play G 13. If you can play Db 12, then you can play C 23. And so on.

    And you can ALWAYS follow that pattern anytime you start with an open position. So let's say you have G above the staff. You can play down from G using the standard fingerings: 0-2-1-0-2-1-12, or you may play them using the following: 0-2-1-12-23-13-123, that's G-F#-F-E-Eb-D-Db.

    It works from high C ... now I can play my G 13 and F# 123.

    Why does 2nd valve work for A? Ever played Bb open? You can, in the upper register, anyway. So if you start open there, A is 2, Ab is 1, and G is 12 (though I don't think I've ever used that one myself).

    Granted, many of these are horribly out of tune. But sit with your tuner and figure out which work well enough with the use of slides and which don't. There's a ton of 'em.
     

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