Does a large bore instrument affect endurance?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by coolerdave, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I have read quite a few players who have commented that their endurance is substancially less when playing their large bore Conn Concert Grands. I think the horn resonates pretty easily and can be played at a low dynamics pretty easily. I think the horn has more projection and gives less local feedback and it doesn't break into that sizzle tone without some effort. I was thinkng that this was more of the reason players experience endurance issues more than the bore size.
    thoughts?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Endurance is affected when the horn mouthpiece player do not match. Large bore horns are not harder to "fill". The expectation of customers is for a large bore horn to blow more freely. The artisans cooperate by designing the things that REALLY affect the blow (braces, bell contour) appropriately. That requires the player to have better control over the chops.
     
  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    thanks Robin.. was looking for your input. What are your thoughts concerning the feedback aspect of the horn.
     
  4. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    Interesting topic. I played on a MEHA from age 15 until past 50, and never really thought about until it was stolen. I bought a used French Besson and was surprised that my endurance and range seemed to be improved. The MEHA was certainly brighter, and more suited to big band playing, which I do very rarely.
    Although I still prefer playing flugel, I have enjoyed playing trumpet more since the switch.
     
  5. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    I recently switched from a Bach 25bell, 25 reversed leadpipe, with ml bore to a Marcinkiewicz CG470. It is a .470 bore until the bell where it goes to .466. At first I noticed my body getting tired more quickly. The chops never tired out any faster and the horn makes the high notes easier to play, but I would be physically tired after about 30 minutes. After a couple of weeks of performing and practicing the early fatigue went away. The body quickly learns to compensate without any thought if you do the work. Regular practice makes endurance better on any horn.
     
  6. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    Not to veer off-topic, but it seems like I always hear that "it's not the horn/mouthpiece, it's the player", which I normally agree with. However, there has to be some differences that a player can notice, right? I was never a gear-head, played the same horn/mouthpiece for several decades, and didn't really know anything about the mechanics of playing the instrument (still don't). This forum is always a good place for an older player to learn what I should have known years ago.
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I am right there with you Duanne .. never paid any attention to gear.. well very little... and you would think that there are things that do affect different aspects, even if you aren't sure what they are. Which is why I asked about the feedback the horn gives. I noticed if I point my Conn towards the wall the volume reflected back is alot more than I would have expected.The Bach feedback is really nice and I don't notice as much variation. So my thinking is that the Conn is really given to over blowing and that would tire you out faster. ... well that's my theory
     
  8. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    4 thousandths of an inch isn't what changed your playing. It is two totally separate designs of horns that did.
     
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  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Feedback needs to match the job. If I am outdoors or in a a soundproofed studio, a horn with more feedback is advantageous. In good sounding halls, I prefer less. It has nothing to do with bore.
     
  10. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I agree with you on that Robin.. I guess I didn't make it clear... I see them as mutually exclusive .... the Conn has a large bore but also seems to have more throw (two different aspects) and my thinking is that the bore size takes the credit/blame for endurance when it is really caused by another aspect of the horn.
     

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