Does it sound like a cornet ?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Lionelsax, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    They are all Eb, but as cornets they need to look like the other cornets. Some have the double-shepherd's crook, which is supposed to sweeten tone, but the real difference is in how narrow they are compared to Bbs The bells are also smaller, and they seem to have shunts rather than triggers, I'm guessing because there just isn't any room for them when you sit one in your hand. They are cute, but the back-pressure is intense. When I first started to play soprano I ovedid it due to the novelty and I was actually forced to go and see the doctor because of the light-headedness I experienced.

    IMHO the sop is the real virtuoso of a brass band.
     
  2. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    Amen to that brother! Like I said in the previous post, the soprano is the real virtuoso of a brass band.
     
  3. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    I think it depends whether the person has learned to play the various variations on the trumpet and has practised them. My overall feeling ids that it's easier to learn the control of a cornet and move from that onto a trumpet. Trumpeters never seem to be able to rein in that control to play British style once they have settled into the (dare I say?) easier straight blowing style of the trumpet.
     
  4. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    Same thing for me with the trumpet. I found flugel far easier, but struggled initially with a very open trumpet.
     
  5. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Sounds like a flugelhorn.

    My view - horses for courses. That type of jazz is not for the typical cornet.

    I would only play cornet stuff on cornet, and trumpet stuff on trumpet. Modern brass band arrangements try and force this sometimes, and although some top bands can carry it off ( eg The Ted Heath sets Black Dyke did under the late James Watson RIP ) the cornets still sound like cornets!

    Get yourself a flugelhorn, mate. They are great for the sound you want.
     
  6. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    Yep. That pretty much says it!

    I think the American long cornets are also used in marching bands especially for youngsters (the guys across the pond will have to correct me here if I'm wrong) but they are basically trumpets anyway so...

    A classical cornet. Hmm...now that's interesting. There seems to be this staunch divide here in the UK doesn't there? I like both. And flugelhorns too.
     
  7. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    It looks like an American cornet, and I can't see whether it has a SC either, although some US cornets do incorporate it. The point is, it isn't the right instrument for this music if it is a SC. He might as well be playing a trumpet! Oh, and thanks for making me listen to 10 minutes of tuneless progressive jazz to find out. I hate progressive jazz!
     
  8. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
  9. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    I think that's it, in a nutshell.

    IMO, the respondents from either side of the Atlantic Ocean are speaking across a vast cultural gulf, as far as how the cornet "should" sound:

    If you've been raised on brass band music, you'll likely have a specific sound concept you consider appropriate for a shepherd's-crook cornet. OTOH, you may not consider a Getzen Eterna or Bach Strad 184 to be a "proper" shepherd's crook cornet. So what's the "appropriate" sound for a Getzen or Bach?

    In the U.S. the cornet tradition essentially died out before WWII. Certainly, cornets remained in use in the post-war era and some band programs insisted on their use, but any stylistic linkage to the European tradition was lost.

    If the OP wants to play jazz on the cornet, the world is his oyster. He can play a trumpet-shaped cornet, an American long cornet, or a Besson Sovereign if he wants. He can use a deep Wick-style mouthpiece or a "bent dime" on a cornet shank. If he finds his voice -- whatever voice that might be -- on cornet, more power to him.
     
  10. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Merry Ol' England
    He can play whatever he wants, but you've missed the point that the OP is looking for a specific sound, and looking, IMHO, in the wrong place. Wasn't that the original question?

    As to what cornets should sound like, in the UK they sound distinct from trumpets; in the US, they sound the same.

    I have both US and European instruments, and my favourite trumpet to play is from the US.

    But as far as cornets go, WE IS BETTER! :D
     

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