Does your Bb fit? Is fit important?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Comeback, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Re: Does your Bb trumpet fit? Is fit important?

    My Getzen Classic is a joy to hold, has glorious valves, and plays well - but I had to adapt my grip to the trumpet. My Harrelson is a lot heavier, is harder to hold for long periods because of that weight, and my left hand hurts after a gig, but it slots so beautifully that it's disadvantages are far outweighed by it's ability to knock out a good tune.
     
  2. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Interesting observation, Tom. My Strad balances similarly with its standard Bach 3C. My ML1s and Super Artist have the valve block a little closer to my face so they are a bit bell-heavy when held like that.
    Jim
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
  3. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Re: Does your Bb trumpet fit? Is fit important?

    I've never played a Harrelson, Ted, or a Getzen Classic either. My Strad, Super Artist and ML1s are all similar to grip, even though the Super Artist lacks a 1st valve slide saddle, and are quite comfortable. Of course, I am accustomed to them. I have an old Blessing Standard that lacks a third valve slide finger ring; I have to re-acclimate myself to it whenever it gets a chance to get out of its case.
    Jim
     
  4. sj3209

    sj3209 Piano User

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    Interesting discussion. I've asked in the past about trumpets that have the valve block closer to your face. One of the reasons cornets feel better for me is that feature. So someone said that the Committee was closest. Any others that also have that feature?
     
  5. misty.sj

    misty.sj Forte User

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    Trumpets are too long for my arms so mutes take extra effort and the third valve slides are never comfortable. Doesn't stop me playing. It's not the most natural position for the body to be in. It's not like my arms will get any longer or my hands bigger, just like I will never be taller than 4'11" unless I wear 4" heels that put me at 5'3".
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My old Selmer piccolo was a pain to play for long periods of time because the upper valve caps would cut into the fingers on my left hand, and I agree with barliman that rotaries are no fun to hold, and make page turns and quick mute changes almost impossible.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    My Getzen tilted bell is easy to hold and is similar to a cornet due to the bell tilt starting at the crook. It was the only trumpet I had, so I learned how to hold it. Now I have to adapt to normal trumpets. My Conn 40B is just plain uncomfortable regardless of how I hold it. The wrap is tiny! After that, all the rest are pretty easy to get used to. My Conn 12A is the most comfortable horn to hold after the tilted bell. Is it important? IMO, yes. The 40B mentioned doesn't get played much.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
  8. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    You've actually touched on a point I hoped to make in this discussion, Misty. All of us are proportioned differently. As long as we produce a sound that pleases us and that is appropriate for our musical contexts, why not use an instrument that is well-suited to us? We sometimes carry on about how a long cornet or other cornet sounds just like a trumpet unless we have a certain sort of mouthpiece. Well, if that is the case and the cornet produces what for us is the right sound, why not simply use it? I wonder sometimes just how much we limit ourselves by our perceptions of what is acceptable to others.
    Jim
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I like the balance of a short cornet and the closeness of the valve section. The worst horn I have for ergonomics is the 19th century side-action rotary cornet, and the most unique is the Conn 6B trumpet with its forward-mounted bell and long mouthpipe - that's the one I have to watch out for my teeth when I play it. It's like hopping on an old Triumph motorcycle...you have to think a second or two before putting it into gear and riding off, because the brake and gearshift are on opposite sides from modern, standardized motorcycles. Get it in your head at the start, and there are no problems.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    If they lowered the height of basketball rims and used smaller basketballs I could'a been a contender!

    Trumpets that work well are hard enough to make--some things, like bracing and the wrap can't be altered willy-nilly without impacting how the instrument plays. Finger rings and hooks can be moved and altered to fit the player's hands without problem, but moving the other stuff around not only opens a huge can of worms, but a huge can of huge worms.
     

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