Doodlin'

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by graysono, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 22, 2007
    Hyde Park, Utah
    I think I have done my homework here, but let's see. I have searched for anything on doodle tonguing with no result. I think I remember Clark Terry commenting on this somewhere (UTube?). Anyway my question is: Is this just the jazzer's version of double tonguing using doo for the first part of the attack and le for the second to accomplish a fast attack for rapid improvs? I assume the fast passages in Freddie Hubbard's improvs are examples? Anyone know about doodle tonguing?
     
  2. seilogramp

    seilogramp Piano User

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    Nov 23, 2009
    Georgia, USA
    Here, in a Randy Brecker clinic, he explains how he uses doodle tonguing. The whole video is good, but skip to 5:50 if you want get to the doodle tonguing part.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Du-dul tonguing is a modified more legato double tongue.
    The actual articulation is "lah-dah"
    The only time "d" is formed twice in a row is at the beginning of a line:
    da da La da La da La da
    The "d" sound has the precussiveness necessary to start the line.
     
  4. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 22, 2007
    Hyde Park, Utah
    seilogramp/Phil,
    Wow, you are one of the reasons you gotta love this website. The Randy Brecker clinic was very nice, and, as you indicated, not just for the du-dul tonguing. (I felt much better when he indicated that he, too, had days after much work, when he just couldn't blow very well.) A great find and I thank you for it. What did we do before all this information was so immediately accessible? (We stayed unenlightened, that's what.)
    markie,
    On the Brecker clinic he says that he does the du-dul tonguing by moving his tongue horizontally in his mouth. My natural tendency is to move mine up and down. What say you?
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Graysono,
    To learn more about "doodlin'" I would recommend listening to Mr. Clark Terry. I can't think of a better "doodler"
    Here's a little something from a text called The Art Of Jazz Trumpet I think you'll find useful. I know I did.
    Text:
    The "l" in lah-dah tonguing is formed further forward in the mouth than the "l" sound used in speech, and the tongue needs to be arched much more. When using this'l' articulation the high arch of the tongue compresses, but does not stop, the air stream. When the tongue drops quickly to the 'ah' position, the sudden increase in the airstream approximates the result of articulation with a hard consonant.
    Hope this helps Good Luck!
     
  6. seilogramp

    seilogramp Piano User

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    Nov 23, 2009
    Georgia, USA
    Randy seems like a real down-to-earth guy that doesn't mind letting you know that he's only human.

    You're welcome. You can see all the Yamaha podcasts here, or subscribe via Zune or iTunes applications. I especially like the Randy Brecker, Allen Vizzutti, and John Hagstrom clinics.
     

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