Double C? Regular C? What does it all mean?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Musician4077, May 30, 2005.

  1. Musician4077

    Musician4077 New Friend

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    May 23, 2005
    Essexville, MI
    Hey, this may sound like a stupid question, but I've noticed a lot of talk about double C. I'm a little confused at what C this is describing. All the musicians around here describe the C above the staff as "double high C", with "high C" being the in-actuality-not-that-high-C in the staff. Do you all consider my "double high C" merely a "high C", and are all of you popping the title of "double" up yet another octave :shock: ?

    Jeff
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    May 11, 2005
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    Really simple

    "C" is in the middle of the staff, third space.

    "High C" is one octave above, or 2 ledger lines above the staff.
    "Double high C or Double C" is one octave above that.
    Notes above that are "Double".

    A "double "F" is ABOVE Double C.

    A double G is not above "High C", it is above "Double C".

    Hope this is helpful.
     
  3. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    yeah, the terminology gets really confusing. Some people call the g sittin on the staff the high g. Others call the g above high c the high g... People ought to stick to one system, lol.

    But shilke b6 uses the same terms I do.

    Low c a line below the staff
    c in the staff
    high c two ledgers lines above staff
    dubba c an octave above that or sittin' on top of 5th ledger line

    As far as other notes, eh, to each their own. lol.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Since I was in high school, high C was always two ledgers above the staff, although there was a short period of time when I thought that tuning C was High C, but that was in 5th grade.

    But, also since high school, ANYTHING that fell between high C (two ledgers above the staff) and Double C (one octave above that) was regarded as "double" register. While this terminology may not be "correct", it was the terminology generally accepted by all of the trumpet players I worked with in my Army band days. For me, double G is the G above High C. (which coincidentally is the top of my practice room range.)

    It's interesting how this discussion pops up time and again.
     
  5. Bear

    Bear Forte User

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    yeah, this does keep poppin up huh? Maybe we all need an internet class on using the search feature.. Save a lot of time and bandwidth... lol.

    Tim
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Yee HAW!
    Are you serious? So a third leger line E is a "Double E", not a "high E"? And a fourth space E is a "High E"? I always thought that the "singas", "doubas" and "tripas" changed at the C of the octave in which the designation holds. Thus, "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "A", "B", "high C", "High D", "High E" & etc. and you would have to play a 6th leger SPACE "C" before you even USED the word "double".

    Manny? Wilmer? What sayest thee?

    I agree, this one keeps coming up time and time again. Maybe it should be part of the FAQ's for membership in the website! LOL
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Low C,
    middle G,
    middle C,
    G,
    high C,
    high G,
    double high C,
    double high G,
    Triple C.

    I call 'em the way I see 'em!

    ML
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    No, fourth space E was just E. Sometimes the E above high C was refered to as just that; "E above high C" and the "doubles" started at F. Then again, we never really had any "rules" regarding that register, but anything above Double High C was "triple" whatever. Like I said, we all knew what each other was talking about in any case.
     
  9. Bourbon City

    Bourbon City Pianissimo User

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    Jun 8, 2004
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    A closed book exam will be held at 8:00 am Saturday morning in the Concert Hall. If you wish credit for this course - be there.
     
  10. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    CLOSED BOOK? No thanks, I'll just audit.

    Harrumph,

    ML
     

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