Double Tonguing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by HSOtrumpet1, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. HSOtrumpet1

    HSOtrumpet1 Pianissimo User

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    Nov 28, 2008
    Michigan
    Does anyone have any tips for me on double tounging techniques. Coordinating the fingering with the tounging and making the ta's and ka's even?
     
  2. Rich Wetzel

    Rich Wetzel Pianissimo User

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    Dec 27, 2003
    Tacoma, WA
    Work with a metronome, start off slow and concentrate on the eveness and accuracy, nice clean and even at slow tempos fist, then gradually increase the speed in small increments.

    The more you do this, methodically and not rushed, the easier and more even it will become, just takes some time and consistently working on it.

    A lot of players will take the Clarke Technical Studies and do several different models when practicing them, i.e. single tongue, K tongue all of it, double tongue, slur 2 or 4, slur all.

    That can be pretty effective, mixing it up and making sure that K tongue is also done as well as the single and double.
     
  3. Genesis3003

    Genesis3003 Pianissimo User

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    Nov 3, 2008
    North Dakota
    Rich gave some good advice. Just to add to it, maybe try a too koo tounge or du gu toungue. I know people who have more success with one than the other, just find the right one for you.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    In the Arban's Book go to the section on double tonguing. Start with the First exercise. Play it at a comfortable tempo. Be sure your ta and Ka are clear and crisp.. Repeat 4 times. Rest in between. Stop for the day with this exercise. When you can play it up to the fastest marked tempo with a met. add the next three exercises. When you can play an exercise up to tempo, check it off and go to the next exercise. do 4 exercises everyday. Let us know how it goes.
     
  5. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 24, 2005
    What works for me it to practice a few studies each day at three tempos...slow, medium and fast. Don't worry if fast doesn't sound clean, just do it and let your toungue air and chops learn how to coordinate themselves. When you go slow, try to make the T and K as similar as possible and play the notes long and connected, not seperated. For me, this works better than moving the metronome up a click everyday.
     
  6. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Michigan
    In some contries it has been banned along with double picking. Sorry I couldnot help myself!!!LOL The advice the guys above gave is right on I am just feeling silly tonight! The other day a friend of mine say one of my practice mouth pieces in my car. He used to be a cop and plays the part well. He started doing a cop that insited my mouth piece was a crack pipe............I did not realise he was jokeing at first and as I started to explain he kept turning up the cop routine until I caught on that he was jokeing.....I guess you have to be their!
     
  7. bandman

    bandman Forte User

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    Practice!!!!! Lots of practice!!!!! Double and triple tonguing are hard skills. They don't get better without lots of practice, and I hate to tell you this, but if you don't keep practicing those skills they will go away!
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I would start VERY slowly and keep that slow tempo for a week. Then jump up 10 BPM and keep that for a week and so on.

    I am NOT a fan of gradually increasing tempo as it just doesn't work in most cases because the necessary discipline and EARS are getting built by practice too. Our brain works with patterns. When we train the patterns slowly and perfectly, the brain can jump into turbo mode and allow MUCH faster playback of the pattern. That is why I say stay way UNDER the mechanical limit, train those patterns accurately. Pick only one day a week to push the speed envelope - just to see. If the results are good, bring your practice speed up a notch - but not to the mechanical limit. Perfect patterns are the practice goal, not fast patterns! Speed comes when the pattern is permanently ingrained in the brain!
     
  9. TrpRobster

    TrpRobster New Friend

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    The best book to help multiple tonguing I've used is not even written for trumpet. Stick Control for the Snare Drummer by George Lawrence Stone. Use the same approach a drummer would use to "even up" his strokes. The patterns are marked R (right) and L (left). Just play Ta for R and Ka for R! Here are some samples to give you the idea:

    All are 8th notes in 4/4:
    TTTT TTTT TTTT TTTT
    KKKK KKKK KKKK KKKK
    TTTT KKKK TTTT KKKK
    TTKK TTKK TTKK TTKK
    KKTT KKTT KKTT KKTT
    TKTK TKTK TKTK TKTK
    KTKT KTKT KTKT KTKT
    TTTK TTTK TTTK TTTK
    TKTT KTKK TKTT KTKK
    KKKT KKKT KKKT KKKT
    TTKT KKTK TTKT KKTK

    Very slowly, do each line as many times as you can on one breath first on one note then apply to scales, arpeggios and Clarkes. Concentrate on getting the syllables to sound the same, speed will come. Work them at pp up to ff. Think of these as Long Tones for the tongue. There are hundreds of these patterns in the book that will keep you busy. There's a section on triplets that work with triple tonguing. You can just make up your own too.

    -Rob.
     
  10. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Another skill worth learning is recirulatory breathing. I mastered it in middle school when I had more time then I knew what to do with. I was still able to do it in college but since I have not done it since then I tried the other day and I can not do it anymore. My body has forgotten how to control those muscles that way.
     

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