Double Tounging - I've been trying for years.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JoSkelker, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    It took me quite a while, but my double tonguing is emerging well now. I had success with tu-ku syllables. Make sure not to start too low, because it can actually be more difficult. It was best for me around tuning C. Try to just get two sixteenths out first, that may help, and then expand to four, then six, eight, etc as time goes on. Make sure you're supporting with air, and keep the tongue forward. Good luck
     
  2. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 19, 2010
    Rochester, NY
    After years- where I actually learned to single tongue as fast as was needed- I actually learned to double-tongue. How I did it was to learn it backward.

    The most important part is the "ga" or "ka", so I just began by practicing that throat attack. Then I went to ga-da, or ka-ta, and did that for long strings. Then finally I just reversed it- and it was a hell of a lot easier!

    Just how I did it.
     
  3. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I also like Mark's approach ... a couple of sixtenths into a note tu-ku-kuuuuuu .... once you got that one... try tu-ku-tu-ku-tuuuuu
    It helps getting the knack of it
     
  4. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Melbourne Australia
    Agree with Mark on this as well. We all struggle, unless you're lucky to have a language that helps to develop a good strong tongue - Sth American as an example. English is a lazy language unfortunately, so practice is the only way to build up.

    I still struggle, but this advice helped a lot; and that was to play a practice session every 2nd day with only Ke-Ka-or Ku. Keep the tongue out of it. This was used with an exercise on the alternate day to then push the single tongue as fast as possible semi-quaver 4 notes per beat - up to 120 bpm. So a metronome is necessary. Then it clicks together..

    On double tongueing - the air support is essential to get it clear and fast.
     
  5. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I find (And others will probably disagree) that thinking of the K as an attatck pushes the sound to far into my throat. It's probably my accent with its flat vowels and hard consonants SO I tend to think of a lighter K further up to the back of my tongue. That seems to help me.
     
  6. JoSkelker

    JoSkelker New Friend

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    Mar 26, 2012
    Hi all,

    Thanks for all the tips.

    One thing I have found, my double tonguing is significantly better when I'm using a practise mute (which is as rarely as possible).
    Since the main difference with a practise mute is the resistance offered by the instrument I tend to think the problem must be more with my air than my tongue.

    There's definitely some useful advice here, I'll be sure to try out as much of it as possible.
     
  7. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    If I can add to the line of thought, it does sound as though it is an air problem. Try to use the tongue as a valve to interupt your airstream so that the air pressure is as constant is possible rather than as the thing that initiates the sound I often use this exercise in the car. Get an airstream going then interupt it with various parts of the tongue to find the sweet spot for singling and doubling then execrise on that, with me its sort of a tikitikitki sound with the airstream constant
     
  8. JoSkelker

    JoSkelker New Friend

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    Mar 26, 2012
    Thanks, it's funny how tu-ku, ti-ki, du-gu etc all work so differently.

    I'm absolutely convinced that accents and the way one announciates also makes a huge difference to this, my teacher and I regularly find that we use entirely different parts of the tongue to produce the same syllable.
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I had never thought about the accents getting in the way. I just "assumed" that the phoenitic writing of the sound would work across the borders ...interesting
     
  10. JoSkelker

    JoSkelker New Friend

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    Mar 26, 2012
    Yeah it is odd, it was after much discussion that (and rather silly moments in my lessons) that my teacher and I discovered this (I'm English, he's Israeli).
     

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