Doubling on another band instrument

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RichJ, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. matterado

    matterado New Friend

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    Aug 31, 2010
    Baltimore, MD
    I high school I was a utility player; trumpet, baritone, and french horn, sometimes all in the same concert. I found the switch from trumpet to baritone pretty easy and it didn't affect my trumpet playing. Just make sure that whatever he chooses, he splits his practice time. Learning a new embouchure shouldn't ruin his current one as long as he practices both and learns to feel the differences. I have heard some people say that playing a different instrument actually improves their tone on their regular horn.
     
  2. lakerjazz

    lakerjazz Mezzo Piano User

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    My bad- I guess they wouldn't usually have piano in the band, but if they do, then... anyways, if not, then I'll just second the drums or just anything that doesn't interfere.
     
  3. chet fan

    chet fan Piano User

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    Jul 3, 2009
    I concur, with trickq,

    but I also would reccomend some piano lessons for him to help him understand harmony better
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    RichJ,
    I say get the kid an instrument he LOVES (or think he will love) - no matter what it is. I only double on Fluglehorn, cornet, and an Eb alto horn (which I don't think is used in bands anymore). so they are not really much different.
    I did pick up a nice clarinet off Ebay for $40 - I wanted to double on that --- but it was so frustrating for me --- that I quit before I really got started. So it wasn't fun, and it is in the closet waiting for me to be in the proper mindset ---someday to pick it up.
    have fun.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Improper storage of a clarinet (or other reed instrument) is asking for double (or greater) trouble than storing a brass instrument. The key control assembly can "lock" up and the pads may look like the dog chewed them.

    Presently, I've a flute and a clarinet put away ... but every 3 months I relubricate and check my pads ... but before I'd put either back in play my tech would do an A-Z inspection and all necessary repairs / adjustments.

    Particularly of interest is that microscopic mites eat the pads of these instruments (that's how the "dog chewed scenario" appears). Too, these pads are secured only with a non-sulfer rubber cement type adhesive that drys out and loosens.

    I store these instruments with a cedar block or ball in the case or just chips when possible plus the instrument and case is placed inside a large Zip Lock bag. Also inside this bag is a disc as visually tells me the dryness / moisture. I've wondered how this goes from one to the other and have been told such is condensation. I'm going to get some of those vacuum bags.

    What would one think of storage of a brass instrument in these vacuum bags?
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Ed Lee,
    thanks for the tips on storing my clarinet. I always store my instruments with clumpable cat litter in an old sock to suck up any moisture and keep out musty smells.
    Other than that as far as my trumpet collection goes (5 trumpets, 2 cornets, a fluglehorn, and an Eb alto horn) --a couple which have been in storage for 7 yrs until my recent comeback --- I only make sure empty the water out, put petroleum jelly on the slides, and oil the valves.
    My Conn student horn from 1975 still has all the working slides, and never any valve problems either. oh another thing I do is put a few drops of oil in where the mpc goes and lightly blow before I put them away.
    and yes -- they tarnish on me, but it gives an "Old Looking Horn" -- and I am 45, and its okay and much easier that way as they don't show the fingerprints as well - lol
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Mostly, my storage was directed to the reeds ... and I just said goodbye to the clarinet for $150 cash.

    As for Conn student horns ... I've no complaints about my Director cornet and Director Coprion trumpet. Noting my CD, Choices, that I've just released such covered the melody with a wee bit of Schilke P5-4 piccolo trumpet added here and there. If you force me I could have played a French horn but such was my worst. In lieu thereof, I've Yamaha Mellophone in F as is in the trumpet configuration for marching. Add to this collection a Conn Artist euphonium, a King slide trombone, and a Kanstul-Besson 609.

    Now you know I've now the need for major dental restoration and I'm recovering from triple coronary aorta bypass grafts. Even at age 74, I'm taking care of my horns and expect to resume playing them within 2 years kowing that it will take at least a year to reset my embouchure and get my other abilities into the capability status.

    PS - With a Q Tip, I apply liquid lanolin to all my receivers. Such I use on tuning, first, and second slides and add my Vaseline to the mix for third slide and T-bone slide. I've been using Holton oil for my valves, but from time to time have degreased them to try others. I don't think Holton now markets their oil in pint cans.
     
  8. RichJ

    RichJ Piano User

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    Northern Virginia
    Well, it looks like my son has selected an instrument for the school music program -- double bass! He'll be playing in the string ensemble rather than the band. I'm glad to not have to worry about another instrument messing up his trumpet playing and also happy that he picked bass all on his own (after seeing a school demo of the instruments). Hope he doesn't like it better than trumpet!
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Double bass, bass viol, or contrabass ... all amounts to a pain when transporting back and forth. I remember my cello and that was bad enough.

    Just prior to moving here, I lived in Alexandria, Fairfax County (Franconia), and Woodbridge. IMO Prince William County has a better music program. Still the best reed tech (IMO) is in Fairfax County. Also IMO, the best string tech (who use to have his store on Duke St, Alexandria Va.)

    Lots of gig work for the bass "fiddle".
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2010
  10. Flat Iron

    Flat Iron New Friend

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    Oct 20, 2008
    Lacombe Alberta Canada
    I have doubled trumpet-trombone for many years ... it does restrict your embochure on both, but can be done. I play more trombone now because there are fewer trombonists around, so more opportunities.
     

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