Doubling on trumpet and trombone

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by thaibo93, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

    1,615
    659
    Sep 29, 2010
    When in high school, I played trumpet, french horn, flugelhorn, and euphonium in jazz and symphonic settings. I believe that this only helped my trumpet playing. As melodictrumpet said, french horn is harder to play than trumpet. You can pretty much play any note with any fingering, the slotting is all over the place....etc....it just made the trumpet seem more and more easy to play. And again, as melodictrumpet said, I believe that playing horn and euphonium shaped my trumpet playing. I became used to deep cup mouthpieces and larger rimmed mouthpieces (before then I only played on 3C's, now I play on 2 and 1 rims with much deeper cups).....that's a different story.....
    So in my opinion, I think you should keep on playing both. Just find good ways to acclimate from instrument to instrument and mouthpiece to mouthpiece and you'll do alright! Hopefully you'll find that doubling helps your playing!
    Good luck,
    Kujo
     
  2. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

    784
    102
    Sep 25, 2009
    Polson, MT
    I vote for playing all three (trumpet, baritone, trombone). If music is going to be your hobby, then make it as much fun as you can. Local churches and community theater won't be expecting pro level players. So what if you're a second or third trumpet? Have fun.
     
  3. casbonano

    casbonano New Friend

    45
    15
    Jun 17, 2011
    Neenah, WI
    Man, trumpet master is such a great resource. I have been playing the trumpet for only 7 weeks now, but I have always loved the trombone and while I don't own a trombone was thinking of picking one up and doubling. This thread has been very insightful.
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    glad the thread is useful ---- I can help you with another very important tip. EASE INTO IT. My experience was that I only played trumpet for 30+ years (with a 10 year break in practices) --- but on a "comeback" to the trumpet after 3 years (and back to better than when I previously had a break in my practice regimen) ------ my community band needed a trombone player who could march in the summer parades. SO I VOLUNTEERED --- never having played a trombone before. so with me, having a pretty good trumpet embouchure already in place, I began the trombone at 10 minutes every other day or so for a month at the end of trumpet practice. THEN, I started mixing the trombone in for a few minutes with my trumpet playing. YOU are building 2 different embouchures, and the most important thing is TOO NOT RUIN ONE while you are developing the other. THE TRUMPET is my primary instrument --- so I slowly added the trombone into my practice, and the whole key was to BE ABLE TO DOUBLE on either instrument at any time, and at any place ---- it took 3 months for that to happen.

    as a trumpet player for only 7 weeks --- I am not sure how relevant my advice is to you. ---- but I am thinking to develop your trumpet embouchure fully (maybe a year or so), before taking on the trombone ---------------- some others may have better advice on slowly doing both -------------------------- my experience (FOR ME) is that to be proficient on both instruments, you need to put in the time on both of them!!!! --------- play and be happy either way, and welcome to TM
     
  5. casbonano

    casbonano New Friend

    45
    15
    Jun 17, 2011
    Neenah, WI
    Thanks, and I certainly hear your logic on possibly getting my trumpet chops going before easing into trombone. I suppose my situation is that as someone totally new to the world of horns (I am in my 30's, studied some classical guitar, and have been a a semi-pro doing the guitar singer/songwriter thing) I would like to see which horn (if any!) I would seem to gravitate more towards. I love the trumpet and had a pretty big store credit at a local music shop. They just so happened to have a really nice Bach 180S37 from 1974 for about the same price so I got the trumpet. But I am from Puerto Rico, and have always been captivated by that Willie Colon trombone thing in salsa and latin jazz. So I am thinking of picking up a PBone just to feel the trombone out. I think with the limited amount of time I have invested in the trumpet, I am still in a good position to try both and see if I fall for one more so than another. I love the sound of both, but maybe I will feel more at home on one. What do you guys think?

    either way, this entire thread has been great given my situation.
     
  6. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

    3,002
    2,340
    Mar 16, 2011
    In my experience playing trombone after developing trumpet chops was a breeze. The only catch was becoming familiar with bass clef and slide positions. After that, it's a piece of cake; the trombone seems very easy to play.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

    8,612
    2,128
    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    Holy crapola you actually took time to learn Bass clef? - I still go through my music and write the slide position over the note ROFL ROFL ROFL ---- as far as liking the trumpet or trombone better ---- the trumpet is "much easier" for me, but I love doubling and plan on continuing to play both ---- so I say to everyone, "just learn both instruments" - play and be happy
     
  8. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

    3,002
    2,340
    Mar 16, 2011
    I didn't say that part was easy. Until it becomes familiar, it's just another form of transposition.
     
  9. Bauerbear

    Bauerbear Mezzo Piano User

    519
    247
    Jul 11, 2012
    Winter Park, FL
    That's why French Horn is easier...
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I guess you haven't been playing horn long. C basso is for sure bass clef for french horn - and not even that seldom!
     

Share This Page