Dry lips?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Myshilohmy, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    AMEN BROTHER!!! When I was a teen, I was recruited by a group of folks to join their church. One of the requirements was forsaking caffeine, FOREVER!! Mt. Dew was my favorite drink at that time and I had a big decision to make. I still do the Dew! ROFL
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Just South of the VA border here in NC, Mountain Dew is a very big seller bought by farmers hereabout. I've also been told its a fair chaser or blend with "swamp water" and that ain't H2O. Don't know, don't booze now. Very high stats on DUI hereabout IMO.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Mountain Dew-The Stanley Brothers - YouTube
    Turtlejimmy on guitar Jbkirby on banjo!
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I've a conundrum as to how to compose the genre of blue grass with a full range of brass horns. At best, I can only sneak in a tuba to replace a string contrabass (bass viol). Would be a real challenge of fast fingering vs. fast pickin'. Anybody got the answer?

    Only three genres popular hereabout: Gospel, Country, and Blue Grass. Gospel I've no problem with, most Country either, but Blue Grass is a game I don't play even with Grandma's mandolin (and yes, I can play it ... if you want to hear me sing, but I don't twang Southern style).
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I think "they" did bluegrass that way on purpose! :D We don't be needin' no dadgum horns! :lol:
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Don't see any jugs, saws, washboards, and wash tubs doin' it anymore either. My Granpa Hawkins was a much called upon barn dance and blue grass fiddler in WV. He went through strings and bows about as fast as the creek flowed after a thunderstorm. He paid for us to send or carry him new from Pittsburgh PA (when they were available).

    I salvaged several bows and had them restrung and sold some as were un-restrung for over $500. I now have both his fiddles (he never called them a violin) one of which he modified with worm gear tuning keys. It was a real show when he played at home as accompanied by Granma or my Mom playing Granma's parlor organ, which wasn't always blue grass, but hymns and classics as well. All I can say is that, although he could sight read music, he was a heck of a improvizationalist, which I wish I was as well on my brass horns.

    The specialist in Fairfax County VA who repaired his violins and restrung his bows appraised the fiddle with worm gear tuning keys at only $100, but his other one at $500. The only thing I learned about violins is that some bows are worth more than the violins on which they are played, and that a mandolin is tuned the same as a violin, viz both are C instruments.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Who cares? Are they wet or dry?
     

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