drying out (beginner question)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by simonstl, Dec 18, 2008.

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  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Liquidy spit - hmmm, could it be lickerty split? ROFL
     
  2. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    Trying just with a mouthpiece in a warm room produced a lot more liquid than it seems like it should, without much space to condense.

    I suspect that this is a beginner issue - maybe even a comeback issue because I remember how to do lots of things that took a while to teach back in 4th grade.

    Hopefully my mouth will adjust to all this strange new activity, realize that it's not actually getting food, and slow down the spit production. Condensation, doubtless, will continue.

    Thanks!
     
  3. BenH

    BenH Pianissimo User

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    Oct 14, 2008
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    Interesting you should bring that up...

    Do you buzz your lips when you play trumpet? You may not know, but I'd be willing to bet you probably don't. Vizzutti does a 'trick' (I'm sure others have too) where he blows (he doesn't buzz) through the mouthpiece then, whilst still blowing, inserts it into the lead pipe - the trumpet produces a note. He then, all the time whilst still blowing, removes the mouthpiece and there is still no buzz.

    The point being, buzzing the mouthpiece isn't the same as playing the trumpet. You may well be producing saliva whilst buzzing the mouthpiece, but I'm fairly certain you're performing a different action than when you play - therefore it may still not be saliva in your horn when you play, even if it's saliva in your mouthpiece when you buzz. Someone else will explain the physics of the resistance of the horn making the lips vibrate (I think that's right) as I'm no physicist. I believe there are very few people who buzz their lips actively when they play, though it is possible and is an approach championed by a few people.

    :-)
     
  4. Bill McCloskey

    Bill McCloskey Piano User

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    Apr 22, 2007
    This is a problem that affects some horns more than others, I've found .Some horns I needed to empty the spit valve constantly and other horns not so much.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't worry about it. There is NOTHING that you can do to lower the moisture in your breath.

    Once you get your chops together, you will be able to play with MUCH less effort and then the vapor levels go down too!

    Just start practicing more. That brings many more benefits than a reduction in waterkey usage!
     
  6. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

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    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    Of course, I had to try this, taking the trumpet off the mouthpiece while holding a note.

    For low C I was definitely buzzing. For the G above that I was buzzing, sort of. Above that, there wasn't a buzz - though maybe some turbulence.

    I've definitely been filling the trumpet with water faster on the low passages, but I'm not certain it's the buzzing.

    Again, hopefully this will go away with time and practice - I just wanted to find out if this was unusual. (It seems to be, or at least people don't remember it.)
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Simon, I too produce a lot of moisture. I think part of the "problem" is that I'm sensitive to the acculumation around the water key that "might" cause bubbling when I play - so I drain the trumpet a lot. If I bring the bell up to a more horizontal position the moisture takes much much longer to reach the bubbling point, but that's not my natural stance, so I drain a lot instead.

    Try this - at the end of a gig, or a practice session with your band, check out the small pools of drained moisture on the floor and analyse whether yours is any bigger than any of the other players - I'll almost guarantee that they are very much the same - ergo, 90% of it is all in your head and the other 50% is moisture. If it continues to bother you, hold the bell up a bit.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2009
  8. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    Just a last update to close this out.

    I think the extra water was largely my mouth's response to unfamiliar activity. As it's become more familiar, the volume of water has definitely come down to levels more like those I remember from the past.
     
  9. jason_boddie

    jason_boddie Piano User

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    Dec 26, 2008
    Jacksonville, FL
    I have the same issue, I have a ton of moisture and empty the spit valve pften. I have noticed something else though, I aso have condensation that trickles out of my bell. I live in Florida, high temps, and humidity. It is weird. i just think it is the massive amount of warm air I use from my super trumpet player lungs.......:)
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    ROWUK - correct again - I've just got to take much more notice of what you post so that I can use it effectively, thanks.
     

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