Dumb question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Hey_Pauly, Apr 14, 2011.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Ahhhh - you've noticed - the very famous, but not often used, very very effective, silent Vulgano "r". :shock:
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Relying on muscle, memory and rear-training is nothing to fret about. Absolutely nothing wrong with this.
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Those silent R's will kick you in the ***.:shock:

    I love those guitar patterns .... there's nothing like it. You learn one pattern and then slide it around for the exact same thing in other keys ... brilliant.

    The trumpet is closer to that than the saxophone, for example, where you learn a set of fingerings and use the octave key. You can ALMOST pick two fingering positions on the trumpet and lip slur up and down for notes that are mostly related in those two positions. But there will always be a few notes out of the scale, depending on what scale you're playing. Close, but no cigar. You can't just learn a pattern, you have to know the notes of the scales.

    Turtle
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Just a note .... you can maximize your rear training by doing all your practicing sitting down.

    Turtle.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Unless of course the muscle you are training is the rear. And if this disussion gets any deeper than this... will, I rectum we shouldn't go there.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    While different trumpets / cornets with a wide variety of mouthpieces and leadpipes plus the lipping of different players will result in alternate fingerings being more responsive in sound / tone, a chromatic scale extended upward and downward within the players capability provides every musical note there is. The pattern or syncopation is really another matter, which due to spacing on a stringed instrument seems automatic but not so on brass instruments. Still, I won't deny a good ear to stringed music will improve one's pattern / syncopation on any other instruments with correlation to key changes and the genre of the music.
     
  8. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    I am not a guitar player so I may not understand the question. But, if it refers to the principle that when a capo is applied, and the chord fingering is done relative to the capo position, effectively resulting in a key change using the same fingering, then there is actually an analog with the trumpet.

    Many early trumpets had a "quick key change" mechanism - and many other instruments even today have it - trombones, double french horns, etc. This involves switching a valve, moving/replacing a slide or something that changes the overall length of the air path - not unlike a capo changes the length of the strings.

    With the "quick change" mechanism activated, the fingering - or slide position - stays the same relative to other notes but the overall key signature is changed.

    Is this what we are talking about?
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The concert key of the music could be transposed to another key as would also change the transposed position of the notes on all the instrument parts. None the less a Bb trumpet / cornet plays two sharps higher in the key signature and two semitones (one step) higher notes than a C instrument vis piano, violin etc.

    A capo is generally used to switch octaves or pitch (key), the closer to the bridge the capo is placed the higher the octave or pitch. Too. most guitars are also C instruments. In a unique logarithmic like spacing of the frets, changes in octave or pitch set a different pattern / syncopation. Too, there are two methods to play a guitar, single note (picking) and chords, three or more harmonic notes together, not unlike a pianist. By listening carefully to a pianist, one can hear a pattern / syncopation that falls similar in math based on a time sequential span reach to each note(s) played. Between the three or 4 valves of trumpets / cornets this span reach is so minimalized that it is beyond human differential sensing. Our octave shifts are accomplished by lipping the change. Whatever, if a guitar is playing lead and a trumpet / cornet is harmonizing, or vice versa, one player has to be aware of the key changes of the other, but both have to synchronize in pattern / syncopation. It should be easier for the trumpet / cornet than vice versa, but it is found that such isn't always so but rarely noticed by an audience, but becomes a problem to the audio engineer that he/she can correct in a recording if they are competent. I've yet to hear a trumpeter / cornetist run an arpeggio against the chording by guitar or piano.

    Yes, to my knowedge the instrument key can also be changed in compensating euphoniums and tubas. My euphonium is not a compensating type.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011

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