E-flat trumpets for rent?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ABCgirl, Apr 8, 2007.

  1. ABCgirl

    ABCgirl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 10, 2006
    Maryland, USA
    Ok, so my uncle tells my the Haydn concerto would be sweet on an E-flat trumpet, and my dad retorts that he'll "just dig down in my oh-so-deep pocket and pull out a couple thousand for that, then". Obviously, not an option. So, as an alternative, do you know where I could rent an Eb trumpet for a few weeks? If so, what price range are we talkin' about here?

    Also, what are the big differences between an Eb and a Bb (my current instrument)? Is an A, for instance, when written in Eb, still played 1&2?

    Thanks so much, guys.

    --Kat
     
  2. michaelm2

    michaelm2 New Friend

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    Mar 23, 2007
    Cleveland, Ohio
    I know at one time Woodwind and Brasswind would rent one for about $60 a week with a two week minimum, but I'm not sure if they still do. If the music is written for an e-flat trumpet the fingerings are the same as for a b-flat. But, moving to an e-flat trumpet is something that you just don't do overnight. It takes a while to get adjusted to a new pitch and trying to get an e-flat to play lyrically will take awhile. When I got my first e-flat, (about a hundred years ago) it took me about six months to make it sound like I was playing a trumpet and not a kazoo. Even now if I have to do something on an e-flat horn I have to prepare for it as I don't play one daily and there's a period of adjustment.

    Good Luck,

    Mike,
    Cleveland
     
  3. Zenith

    Zenith New Friend

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    Dec 26, 2005
    Kat,

    Some "transposed fingerings" on Bb are really tricky but dead easy on Eb(because the music was wrote for a Eb horn i guess...). Also, upper register is a bit easier...but you have to get use to the intonation problem of Eb, ie when to lip down or up or the 3rd slide issue. It's different from Bb. I guess an hour of practice can let you have a rough idea of this. As far as where to rent, I dont know really. Sorry for that. Good luck~

    Edit: The sound of a Eb is more light and bright also, IMHO.

    Zenith
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2007
  4. DubbaCTrumpetMSU

    DubbaCTrumpetMSU Mezzo Piano User

    550
    3
    Dec 29, 2006
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Well, I would rent you mine, but I have to play the Bach Magnificat in a month or so...when/how long do you need it for?
     
  5. ABCgirl

    ABCgirl Pianissimo User

    79
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    Nov 10, 2006
    Maryland, USA
    DubbaC, I've PMed you. That way I don't clutter up the thread with our communications... Thanks.

    --Kat
     
  6. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

    841
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    Nov 5, 2003
    Dubai, UAE
    Play it on Bb. It sits really nicely.

    Regards,


    Trevor
     
  7. Gary Schutza

    Gary Schutza Pianissimo User

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Kansas City
    You didn't mention how old you were. If you are a younger player, or one that has only been playing a few years, you would be better advised to learn it on the standard Bb trumpet. I prefer not to see younger players mess around too much with the smaller trumpets. If there are any playing (breathing/tension) problems, the smaller trumpets tend to magnify them. Make sure you are really well grounded in the basic Bb trumpet before you branch out to the C trumpet (1st), D/Eb (2nd), then perhaps picc.

    You know I'd like to bring up a point that my teacher (Frank Kaderabek) mentioned a few times. He felt that a player that was more comfortable on the Bb trumpet had a better time with the Eb trumpet, and that in his experience a player that tended to be more comfortable on the C trumpet seemed to have an easier time with the D trumpet. Does anyone have any thoughts on this? I'm not talking about not being able to play the other horn at all, I just meant that those combinations seemed an easier switch to him for most of his students.
    In my experience I think it has held true. I'm probably more comfortable on the C trumpet, though I play the Bb about half of my practice time. And until fairly recently, I have always been more comfortable on the D (perhaps only because I never had a particularly good one until very recently)

    What does anyone think? Does this hold true for anyone else?

    Of course, I realize that we are all Gods on all the instruments in the arsenal. I don't mean to imply that one always plays well only either the Bb/Eb or the C/D combinations. I only speak about the ease with which some students make the change.
     
  8. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Nov 16, 2005
    Vidin, Bulgaria
    I don't know what shops is there around but I used to rent instruments from Spada - they would rent any second hand trumpet they have in stock. I remember paying something like 60$ for 2 months for a piccolo which I took in order to play a piccolo (the horn was an excellent french besson) piece for an entrance exam at RNCM (Manchester, UK). Look around and you should be able to find something usable
     
  9. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

    841
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    Nov 5, 2003
    Dubai, UAE
    Gary,

    It's an interesting point. In the UK a common combination is the use of Bb and Eb to cover all the bases. I guess that both types of trumpet provide a contrast soundwise so players who have their transposition skills well honed can cover most eventualities.

    Is it cultural (I can't help but think that brass banding is a factor) or based on common usage? I don't know.

    Nick, you studied in the UK. Any input?

    Regards,


    Trevor
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Germany
    Kat,
    There are only 4 bars in the first movement of the Haydn and a string of trills in the 3rd movement that are easier on the Eb. The Haydn is a piece that just about everybody knows, so you should be "at home" with the horn that you play it on so that nothing unexpected creeps in.
    If you do not have proper time to acclimate, use the Bb. Don't even start confusing yourself with the new fingerings. Believe me, if you have practiced the Haydn in Bb enough to perform it, those fingerings will creep into the Eb version when you are under stress. If you have 6 months to prepare, then the Eb could be a very fun alternative!

    Trumpet parts are usually transposed so if you have an Eb part, A is still fingered 1+2 when played on an Eb trumpet - all the other fingerings stay the same too - providing the Eb trumpet is in tune.

    Gary,
    Some players do not get caught up with the pitch of a trumpet at all. Others in fact, find a Bb/Eb easier. Players that get along with a Bb/C switch can generally use any horn combination without too much trouble. The basic problem with the D/Eb is that there are so many VERY out of tune ones out there! Most often they are bought at the last minute because you need one, and then at a price that you can afford because you do not anticipate playing it all that much anyway. That is the WORST way to buy a trumpet(!) and you are punished because it usually very inferior to your standard horn. Most players stick it out with that bad purchase and start using alternate fingerings to try and get it back in tune - tone and security suffer. The only real solution is the bin! We haven't even begun to talk about the match between the mouthpiece and the higher pitched horn!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    My students start with the Bb, then comes the C and then the picc because that is where the money is - helping to finance the rest of the horns.


    Trevor,
    Brass banding uses Eb Cornets and that is a completely different world. You are not expected to blow walls down with that instrument and because they are conical in bore, they are generally better in tune and play more easily.
     

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