E-flat trumpets for rent?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ABCgirl, Apr 8, 2007.

  1. camelbrass

    camelbrass Mezzo Forte User

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    Robin,

    I'm aware of the role of the sop cornet. My point was really just conjecture...it's just that Eb instruments are important to the sound of a brass band and that a lot of the orchestral trumpeters in the UK have and had BB backgrounds. I'm probably putting 1 and 1 together and getting 4.


    Regards,


    Trevor
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2007
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Trevor, your 1+1 does = 2, for the handful of brass band players that get orchestra jobs. They have that pitch in their ear giving security, and after playing an Eb cornet, would not accept an inferior Eb trumpet anyway!
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    My opinion is that you play everything on the Bb until you can afford to buy the alternate pitched horns you desire. Nothing wrong with playing it on the Bb. I play it on the Eb most of the time but about 15 years ago I played it on the Bb with a youth orchestra for their inaugural concert. Phil Smith has done the same, maybe he still does. In Germany, that's the only way they play it.

    I also play it on the Eb because the cadenza I wrote is taxing on the Bb. Otherwise, I think it's just fine on the big horn. Yes, it's easier on the Eb but what you garner from playing it on the big horn stays with you for a lifetime.

    ML
     
  4. ABCgirl

    ABCgirl Pianissimo User

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    Maryland, USA
    Well, I'm 16 years old, but I've been playing for eight years and I'm almost ;-) a college student (i.e graduating in 2 months). I would say I'm pretty solidly grounded in the Bb, though my high range is weak because I had braces for 2 of those years (ouch).

    But, I've made what is probably a wise decision. I've decided to stick with the Bb, as I only have 2 months left to prepare. But if I place in the competition (thus getting to perform in the concert) I'll try to switch over (and it looks like there's a place I can get one from--thanks principaltrumpet!). I'll have several months to prepare then, as the contest is in June and the performance would not be until at least the next fall, possibly spring.

    Rowuk,
    Thankfully, I'm not playing the 3rd movement, only the first. The 3rd (including that string of trills) is past my level at this point. Maybe next year on that one. Really, for the Eb, I was hoping it would make the high stuff sound better, as I'm a little strained (although I do hit that high Eb!).

    Thanks so much for your input, guys!

    --Kat
     
  5. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I have studied manly in Switzerland (Conservatoire de Fribourg) but has spent also one year in Manchester (Royal Northern College of Music). My impression is that mnetalities regarding horns to use is evolving fast in UK especially in North England.

    In London and south of it, trumpeters seems to be happy with the E flat/B flat/piccolo piston valve equipment for most things. That is what was Maurice Murphy and Rod Franks were doing. However we have Alyson Balsom, who is playing mainly C trumpet and piccolo on recordings (I don't know what she is doing on concerts as I have never attended one). Londoners seems also a bit unwilling to use rotaries. Again, I would say that Alyson is rather an exception when using Scherzer's rotary piccolo for baroque stuff

    On North however, rotaries and c trumpet seem to be more common (my teacher, Murray Greig who is principal at Opera North was using both). My London impressions are from 2 years ago visit, so it may be different at present.

    I think that it is rather common usage than cultural: while the brass band center of England is rather North West, C trumpet is more common there...For some reason London seems to be more traditional, while North West seem to "suffer" more of american and german/austrian influence. One of my teachers there, John Miller, spent couple of years studying in US with Vachiano and probably with Dr. Collins too (I am not sure of the last).
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2007
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Miss Alphabet,

    If your high register is not fully developed, is the Haydn concerto a wise choice? Would Hummel or Neruda not be wiser? Both build endurance without asking for extremes and are beautiful concerti. If you have a choice and two months to prepare my vote would be for the Neruda then Hummel.

    ML
     
  7. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I would vote for Neruda too. I would say that Hummel is more challenging stamina wise than Haydn, though Haydn requires higher range.
     
  8. ABCgirl

    ABCgirl Pianissimo User

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    Nov 10, 2006
    Maryland, USA
    Mr. Laureano,

    Thank you for your suggestion. I wouls say my high range is strong enough to perform the concerto's first movement sufficiently, though I would not be able to do it multiple times in succession. In that case, I guess it is more of a high range endurance issue.

    Also, the application (including the concerto selection) was due a week ago, so I am bound to the Haydn. Besides that, my best bud in orchestra is already doing the Hummel. A) I would rather be original and B) I'm good friends with him and don't like the idea of trying to show him up, if you get my meaning.

    Anyway, I think the Haydn will work for me on the Bb, although I would love to learn the Neruda and the Hummel for practice and the future. I'll keep you updated on how the competition goes, in any case!

    --Kat
     

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