Edward H Tarr - last few public performances

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by barliman2001, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Just an hour or so ago, I had the rare chance of hearing Edward H Tarr perform in our local parish church. Theconcert was arranged by a few friends of his, almost no publicity, almost no audience (less than 50 in a church seating 500). His wife was on the organ, and a local brass quartet filled in a few pieces. It was not a strenuous programme -Jeremiah Clarke, Purcell, Susato, a few Gershwin arrangements and Oscar Lindberg's Scandinavian Psalm sadwiched in with a few organ solos. What struck me was the total honesty in musicianship Edward H Tarr displayed both while playing and during the conversation we had afterwards. Interesting for me was that on all the trumpets he used - a very long model Yammie picc (the one where the leadpipe goes into #1 and the bell leaves #4 almost straight), a Yammie Xeno Bb and a gold-plated Xeno C he utilized extremely small wooden mouthpieces (somewhere in the region of 15 C Bach, almost as small as a cornetto mpc, with very wide rims). We did not discuss the matter, as he was expected at a private dinner afterwards; but it showed me that mouthpiece size and sound size don't correlate - his sound was big, ouncy and beautiful.
    Unfortunately for me this was almost his last public performance - I would have loved to hear more from him. But he is deservedly retiring from the stage and will only play one more concert - in Rheinfelden in Switzerland, around New Year's Eve.

    Thank you, Edward H Tarr, for all your work in research, teaching, and on the concert stage.
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I would love to have seen him play in person. Very cool!
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Well, Dale, you have one chance left - In Switzerland!!
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Ed Tarrs legacy is not only his playing, it is also all of the students that he breathed life into, all of the documentation and books that he wrote. He single handedly got the whole historical performing practice movement going for trumpet and cornetto. He may not have had the "commercial" playing success that someone like Maurice André did, but I am sure that he influenced more "serious" classical performers than anyone else.

    I heard him play a lot in the 70s, 80s and 90s. I don't think that I want to hear him today. The last Maurice André performances were disappointing to me, it was only possible to imagine how good he WAS...........
     
  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Maurice André, during his last performances, was a very sick man confined to a wheelchair.
    Edward H Tarr is amazingly young for his age, an agile, active giant (at somewhere around 7ft. in height). He explained his choice of the longest possible picc thus: "Since I am a somewhat big guy, a small picc would look rather ridiculous in my paws..." He is enjoying life to the full, and that shows in his playing. Not much of a difference between his CD recordings of twenty years ago and today (except that one has a feeling that now, all his experience as a teacher is channelled through his horn). In fact, I could almost hear him teaching himself during the concert... without this extraordinary feeling in any way distracting from the music.

    I came to that concert with theintention of making all possible allowances for an old, old man at the end of his career. What I found was a musician still enjoying his full capabilities and knowing exactly that it's best to retire when you will be rembered at your zenith... I enjoyed my talk with him extremely - as must have he, for he offered to stay in contact and invite me to his definitely last concert. If that's feasible at all, I'll be in Switzerland at the New Year...
     
  6. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Wish I could go to Switzerland too. Ed Tarr is one of these most influential players that we should hear live. I wish I had a chance to hear Maurice Andre back in the 70s when he was at the very top of his art. I heard Miles Davis in Paris in one of his last few concerts and it was a disappointing experience, kinda like what Rowuk described. On the other hand, an up and coming Roy Hargrove opening for Wynton in Vienne back in the 90s ,that was mighty rewarding :-)
     
  7. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Speaking of Maurice Andre, he was the guest artist for one of our local symphony concerts when I was a member. It was in the early 1980's and he was pretty amazing.
     
  8. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    I've never had the opportunity to see Tarr perform, but have spent many hours listening in wonder to his recorded performances on natural trumpet. He has always been right up there on my list of great performers, along with Hermann Baumann on natural horn, Heinz Holliger on oboe, Arkady Shilkloper on a variety of horns, Rich Owens on piano, Mnozil Brass - artists not to be missed whenever an opportunity arises. Tarr has contributed far more to trumpet knowledge than just about anyone, ever.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I've had the opportunity to hear Dr. Tarr on several occasions, attended one of his master classes, and even played with him (the Vulgano part, of course). A great player, musicologist and all around good guy.
     

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