Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetfart123, Jun 1, 2013.

  1. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    Hi are there any other trumpeters with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome? Would be nice to hear of your experiences you have had difficulties or benefits ect.
     
  2. Sharvey

    Sharvey Pianissimo User

    93
    31
    Dec 25, 2012
    Australia
    I'll take the bait. What is Ehlers Danlos Syndrome?
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,306
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited disorders marked by extremely loose joints, hyper-elastic skin that bruises easily, and easily damaged blood vessels. A variety of gene mutations (changes) cause problems with collagen. This is the material that provides strength and structure to skin, bone, blood vessels, and internal organs. The abnormal collagen leads to the symptoms associated with EDS.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,306
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    May I ask you to take the lead... What has been your experiences related to this condition? Regarding your embouchure? Regarding your hands and finger actions in holding your trumpet?
     
  5. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    The major problem I have is with the finger that holds down the third valve. The muscles around this finger are particularly weak. I have over come this by doing some physio. I made some finger weights (I stuck four 50 euro cent coins together, this weighed about 30 grams. I selotape this to the end of my finger and do exercises with pushing upwards, a bit like bench presses, and I do a reverse of this, a bit like curls, this has developed the muscles around this finger. What was happening, because the muscles were weak, I was not hitting the third valve properly, I was hitting it cockeyed, this resulted in the third valve not popping back up quickly which effected my play. The second problem I had, it took ages to get into high notes just above the staff, say to G. However, I am doing excercises and I am now getting access to the high register much easier, I am now at High E. The other problem I have is holding high notes for a long period, but I guess this is just a case of practice and hard work.
     
  6. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

    7,072
    4,665
    Jan 30, 2009
    Melbourne Australia
    Very ingenious.

    Nothing shabby about that. What time-frame are you talking here? Getting to a G takes some time, but usually it takes a lot longer to get to the High C, as you have to get through the Bb Harmonics as well. High E, if reliable is more than enough for most players. That is not a shabby range. Can you run double octaves up and down to the High E? Is so, it impresses me.

    And yes practice, with a sensible routine and a goal driven schedule will move you - as we all have to do it this way, at least I am with you and I don't suffer your health problem, You're doing OK.
     
  7. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    It took me the best part of 3 years to get to G, then a good while to get to A, but since then I have been on a bit of a roll, finding it easier to get the notes above A, I am not sure what you mean by running double octaves, I usually do Flow Studies to get me upto E, and it is not easy, but the leap from A to E, was much easier than it was from G to A.
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,460
    7,037
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    They are weak for all of us. Leaving the little finger free from the hook allows the two fingers to work in tandem.
     
  9. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    Nice one, thanks Vulgano
     

Share This Page