Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetfart123, Jun 24, 2014.

  1. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    Hi, just wondering if there are any trumpeters out their who have EDS, and how this has effected their playing?

    Thanks
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Well, we have 26000 members here at TrumpetMaster and about 800 have posted more than occasionally. Statistically that means at best, 2.5 EDS victims have ever been here and no one has ever asked the question. I had a clarinet/saxophone playing girlfriend in high school with EDS. She had to tape her fingers sometimes to be able to reliably cover the holes when playing the clarinet. She is 57 and still playing (but not anywhere near me).

    I would be surprised if there were any responses. The innate weakness of the skin and susceptability to bruising would end a serious career fairly quickly. I can't imagine it being very fun.
     
  3. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    Hi Rowuk,

    Many thanks for your reply, my main problem is blowing and getting a rich sound, my notes sound thin and sketchy in the upper registered, especially if I have had a bit of a break it takes a good while to get back up again, and even then it sounds thin, at a cross roads and thinking of calling it a day. I have been playing for almost 5 years, and have been stuck with this problem for a good while.
     
  4. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

    1,094
    329
    Nov 16, 2009
    Near Portland, OR.
    I guess your prospects would depend on the type and severity. It seems that type 1-2 would allow you to play, whereas type 3-4 could place too many limitations; as I recall, the other types are exceedingly rare and present problems more important than trumpet playing difficulties. If you are not taking lessons, perhaps you should meet with a teacher, since the sound symptoms you describe could be due to numerous other factors. Beyond that, I'm not sure what to tell you.
     
  5. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

    7,072
    4,665
    Jan 30, 2009
    Melbourne Australia
    Hi Mate,
    Are you playing with any one else?
    There's plenty of Irish tunes that you can play without a high range.

    There are many parts written for 3rd and 4th chairs for harmony - so it depends on finding the right band that meets your restrictions - don't give up. Just work around it. I do not know what you are going through, so I cannot fully understand the situation. But if you enjoy it, then fight through. My best wishes for you to make the right decision for your health, and your spirit.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I would be careful about drawing a tie between EDS and how you play. What you describe is common for many "ordinary" trumpeters too. In their case it stems from lack of a proper daily routine. EDS is not equivalent to no muscle tone.
     
  7. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    If you don´t have the type of EDS where your blood vessels are fragile,
    then maybe there is no danger as such to play the trumpet (I´m no doctor,
    though . . .).

    When it comes to "almost five years", that´s not any long time at all.
    You can find thousands of posts in here, written by players who have been
    playing much longer, asking for advice regarding the upper reister.

    Get a good teacher and do what we all have to do; have Patience!
     
  8. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

    162
    11
    May 9, 2010
    Ireland
    Hi guys, thanks for all your kind advise, I have two teachers, and both have spotted this problem, i guess it is just something to work around, many thanks again
     

Share This Page