embochure plays "in the red"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TpetHunter, Dec 10, 2015.

  1. TpetHunter

    TpetHunter New Friend

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    Nov 27, 2015
    Hello everyone. I have a problem with my embochure that I currently play "in the red", meaning you can see the red of my lip at the top of the mouthpiece, which is apparently a serious issue that no one has addressed with me until now. I am in my first year of college and am in marching band, pep band , and next semester i am in either university band or concert band. I tried to not necessarily fix it, but messed with it in a practice room by doing lip slurs and long tones. After I was well warmed up this weird thing happened where I would try to do slurs and lip bends and my mouthpiece would slip back into the old playing style. I've talked to many people about this and some say I have to change it, and others say if it isn't broken, don't fix it. So what do you all think? any specific exercises I should do to fix the problem or should I just leave it since my tone, range, and style are pretty on par with a collegiate band? any comments appreciated.
     
  2. Msen

    Msen Piano User

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    I'd say fix it. Maybe changing your mouthpiece will help. I imagine one with a bigger rim will sit on top of the red.

    Doesn't it hurt when you play like that?
     
  3. TpetHunter

    TpetHunter New Friend

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    Nov 27, 2015
    No not at all. I can go up and down the register just fine. I currently play on a 5c so I will mess with some mouth pieces bigger than that I guess.
     
  4. Msen

    Msen Piano User

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    Dec 28, 2011
    I live in the Horn
    That would be bigger outter diameter. Just to be clear. Going for a deeper cup will not change much.

    How about your teeth? maybe that's the root cause.

    My mouthpiece sits a little bit to the left cause my left front tooth is slightly in front of the right one
     
  5. TpetHunter

    TpetHunter New Friend

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    Nov 27, 2015
    Honestly I think it's due to the fact that I had a cold sore when beginning to play and that caused me to adjust the mouth pieces up because the cold sore was on my lower lip. I sometimes drift to the right a bit after hours of continuous playing by habit because of the cold sore.
     
  6. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    I say if it ain't broke don't fix it. I'm no pro or any kind of teacher but if it's not a problem for you and you don't feel that it's holding you back then go with it
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I don't know where "playing in the red" became the wrong way to play whereas some part of the mouthpiece rim will be on the red however it is placed. IMO some part of the mouthpiece rim should be in contact with the white just to give support and allow the red to provide an optimum buzz and not a weak buzz or flubber. If it works for you now however you position it, I'll not recommend you change now. I just guide a student to the white in the formative years which you have long passed.
     
  8. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I'm with Ed in this I think - I found I play with a "warmer" or "richer" tone when I have played with the softer/fleshier part of my lips than when I draw them closer against my teeth. I don't play that way normally and when I did it wasn't for long enough to know if it affected my endurance or longer term playing health (in any way).

    But I have seen people writing that they were concerned about this way of playing, and once somebody who wrote here was told not to worry about then when they explained they had very large lips.

    --bumblebee
     
  9. Clarkvinmazz

    Clarkvinmazz Forte User

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    I was in this situation a couple years ago. My teacher eventually convinced me to change it, and although it was frustrating in the beginning, it has really improved my playing overall. My endurance and range increased, as well as my slurring and articulation improved. I'd say it's worth it, based on my own experience.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    We all have differences in our facial and dental structure, thus what works for one may not work for another. No teacher/tutor/director ever advised me to change my mouthpiece placement, and I found it necessary to rebuild my embouchure several times.
     

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