Embouchure Change

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpetplayer24, Apr 11, 2015.

  1. Clarkvinmazz

    Clarkvinmazz Forte User

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    i have to agree with rowuk on this one. Constantly switching mouthpieces doesnt give your muscles enough time to learn what they should properly, and could very well impact the player farther down the road. as for the OP, i went through an embouchure change very similar to you a couple years ago and had the same problem. as Rowuk said, log tones and relaxation are the key. i find lip bending and free buzzing to be really helpful with this. try the lip bending exercises in the schlossberg book, thats what helped me the most.
     
  2. DaChan

    DaChan Pianissimo User

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    OK, well I'm just saying that a less structured approach has worked for me. I'm not satisfied with my level of proficiency but given the hours I've put into playing, I'm not disappointed either. I have to wonder how much more or less playing I'd have done without switching mpcs, horns, improve styles etc depending on mood and interest. For me, exercises are a thing to do more often when I can't decide what I want to play. After all, I do this for fun and rarely for money. It isn't chaos, it's curiosity. Like, I wonder if I'll notice a difference this week if I practice the upper register all day. I wonder if I will internalize a new way of phasing if I practice ballad on this oldcornet all day. I wonder if these sticky notes will be better in a couple days if I work on long tones specifically directed at the sludgy notes. Etc. I think it works well for me. I don't think I've flat lined or lost ground. If something works for you, do it.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    DaChan, I don't think that there is a "right" or "wrong" here, I think that there are ways to increase the odds or turn everything over to luck. There are a lot of specifics with embouchure changes that the internet questioners NEVER have considered. I don't even address them because it doesn't work without having seen and heard the player 1 on 1 during a real lesson. There is no downloadable cheat and plenty of plain garbage on the internet however, and that drives me to stay here at Trumpetmaster and at least offer things that are safe, reliable and repeatable without monitoring. Most of the threads like this NEVER get a followup. When the player is REALLY interested, they PM for advice instead of getting further confused. Who they PM is probably significant.

    If you structure 15 minutes a day, it is a sure bet that inside of a couple months you will reap great benefits. Generally this leads to more structure and fun because we simply can accomplish more with less effort. That gives curiosity a reliable channel!
     
  4. DaChan

    DaChan Pianissimo User

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    I can absolutely agree that 15 minutes of structure per day is a great thing! No question about it. Hell, I'd go so far as to say that had I committed to that from the start I'd probably be a better musician today. That said, I probably do quite a bit more than 15 minutes of exercises per day now, but when I started I wasn't really aware of what to do, so I just made it up as I went along. I'm very happy that I learned the way I did, but I would definitely add that 15 minutes of long tones, scales, articulation stuff, sight reading and transposing would have helped me in the long run. For me, it comes down to how I learn which is trail/error/repetition and focus. I achieve this when I lose myself in something. I don't play well when I'm trying to play something, I play better when I am already in the thing that I'm playing. Exercises help smooth the transition from one state of mind to the other, and 15 minutes per day is unquestionably a reasonable amount of time to spend working on 'fundamentals' as I have often heard them called. The remaining 45 minutes, 1h:45m, 2h:45m, 3h:45m... etc ...are generally for exploration... :)
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I cannot disagree with this part ofyour statement, and in fact, I think it is well stated. But once your muscleshad enough time to learn, they develop a flexibility through control to rapidlyadapt to various mouthpiece sizes. This is the level at which I have reached,and I use it often to get the most out of my playing to produce the soundtexture I desire. On the flugelhorn, I want to have more freedom to move withinthe mouthpiece to embellish the airflow which is why I use a really deep piecewith a wide cup, but in the very next tune when I switch to a trumpet forflexibility of running runs from high to low ends of the scale, I prefer my narrowercup, and I make the transition quit well without the loss of control in using eithermouthpiece. So for me constantly switching mouthpieces does not impact on theability of my muscles to control the performance.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Gary,

    is it the chops that get flexible - or your brain that learns to deal with a bigger spectrum of colors? All of the working players that I know get stable chops first then broaden the palette. I think that once we get our sound concept down, color is the issue. We do not pick random mouthpieces, rather complementary color and similar "feel".

     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Does this mean that we should concentrate on creating an island of playing stability first, more-or-less regardless of colour, and branch out from there rather than trying to emulate Dokshizer or Mendez from day 1?
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO, it would help many.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Rowuk, I couldn't have said it any better. Thanks for completing that thought for me. Paint my brain in rainbow!:think:
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Seth, I believe doing this first, will increase the efficiency of the latter.
     

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