Embouchure help needed!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Miguel..., Mar 24, 2014.

  1. Miguel...

    Miguel... New Friend

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    Mar 24, 2011
    I noticed that every time I take a breath my embouchure gets destroyed. I've managed to "fix" it by setting the embouchure and applying some mouthpiece pressure to keep it in place and then take a breath through the corners.

    Is this solution acceptable or is it just a quick fix that will bring problems in the future?

    Thanks in advanced!
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Try breathing through your nose, see Carmine Caruso "Musical Calesthenics for Brass".

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  4. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Sometimes you need to take a breath big enough to expand the rib cage in a short amount of time... ain't gonna happen through the nose. You need embouchure work. I am in the same boat. My teacher can open mouth, take huge breath, has a HUGE amount of blowing power/support and his embouchure is always set. Seek to perfect not to take short cuts.

    Your embouchure get's destroyed... then that is an obstacle you need to work on/overcome, not find a different way to 'avoid' it. This is what sets professionals apart from those that never make it. The professionals work at things until it works, the rest just cut corners.
     
  5. Miguel...

    Miguel... New Friend

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    Mar 24, 2011
    I can't my nose is stuffed most of the time lol

    The other way I can keep the same embouchure setting is when I play with most of the bottom lip inside the cup
     
  6. Gxman

    Gxman Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Have you got a teacher?

    It is important to have one that knows technical things observe how you play, it will help greatly before you do what I did, try work it out on your own, and find everything you done is wrong. Ask the members here. I had all the 'embouchure' questions, i had all the videos, I had all the pictures of myself/playing.

    None of that helped in correct recommendation. Only once i had a teacher in person were things pointed out, helped/fixed. Even now I am still working on this, but I know what I am working towards, and correctly. No video/pictures online helped.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Have you got a good doctor?
     
  8. BigSwingFace

    BigSwingFace Pianissimo User

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    In my experience it's always a good idea to breathe through the corners. This keeps the center set in place but allows the muscles on the sides to briefly relax. Breathing through your nose as in a Caruso exercise will definitely work but it would take superchops to be able to do that through a set. I would suggest trying not to use pressure from the mouthpiece; just use your muscle memory insure you keep the same feel in the center when taking a breath from the corners. As Maynard Ferguson said, "I grip the mouthpiece, the mouthpiece doesn't grip me."
     
  9. Harky

    Harky Pianissimo User

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    Feb 22, 2013
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    I have to jump in and am hoping the original poster has had no instruction from a trumpet instructor. I simply cannot wrap my brain around a player who has not learned or was never taught to breath from the corners of his/her mouth the first week he has played. I hope it was not his fault but.... jeeez!

    Recommendation: Breath from the corners of the mouth, keep chops on the mpc every breath. Just that simple. Let's not make it more complicated that it needs to be.

    Having said that I distinctly remember my first lesson forty five years ago when I was told to keep my chops on the mpc and inhale from the corners of my mouth. Later I learned that it was also okay to allow any air that can make it in through the nose to supplement the mouth breath. The rest was learning to breath deeper and deeper as I developed.
     

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