Embouchure Help!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by likefoxes, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. brunets

    brunets Pianissimo User

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    May 28, 2007
    Gatineau,QC
    Hi likefoxes,

    I totally understand your statement. However, to me, you didn't have the chance to get the right teacher that made you love your instrument. The teacher/student relationship is almost as important as the content of each lesson, especially in private lessons.

    Stéphane
     
  2. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Playing a windinstrument of any kind is totally different from drums, piano or stringinstruments. Drums, piano and guitar is played with your fingers and arms, and the scales are lined up, so if you move your finger upwards, the tone is higher. You can breath whenever you want, you can show your theets to the audience and your head can be placed wherever you want, and it don't need to be in contact with the instrument at all.... A windinstrument is a totally other kind of animal. A trumpet has to be played with your whole body; your chops has to be in the right position on the mouthpiece, you need to breath (enough) an correct on the right places, (you can't breath whenever you want to....), your tongue should be in the right position, your fingers placed on the right valvecombinations. You can't show your teeths to the audience. This is the basics. When you start playing, and all the basics are ok, you are the tuner/equaliser and the trumpet is the loudspeaker. A perfect tuned tuner/equalizer can give a great sound out of a rotten loudspeaker. So if you want to be a trumpetplayer, and learn fast, the best is to have a teacher who knows about these secrets, to tell you how to do to achieve these skills, or, you can buy a book like Mick Hesse's, (he is on this forum and yo ca have a look at his book here Welcome ) which is not like a standard method book like Arban's or Clarke, but more like a guidance for performers, or, you can do as myself, play the cornet/flugel/trumpet in 30 years before you find out how and why things are like they are. Good luck with your playing!:play:
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I have no statistics about DIYourselfers that have succeeded or failed, just experience how hard it is to help them unlearn everything that they twisted into shape.

    If you have had trouble with lessons, it was most likely a two way street with whatever teacher you had. Either you did not pay attention to credentials and picked a dud or were not willing to let yourself develop proper structures before forming an opinion. I get this same BS line from the DIY students during the first lesson or two. If they do not have the material that I gave them the week before prepared, I send them home. If your goal is only not to sink, you can jump into the deep end of the pool first. If your goal is to get the most pleasure out of an activity, there are procedures that can aid development. Taking lessons is a COMITTMENT not a downloadable cheat! It is not my "job" to defend my teaching practices - especially to someone that has NO IDEA. They get enough proof with what comes out of the horn - if they give it a chance. Ask anyone in AA or weightwatchers if 2 sessions will break habits. There is no difference!

    Proper body use and embouchure development require monitoring and tutorage. Very small deficits can block major developments. I have never played with a DIYer that has convinced me of anything - other than the need for lessons. But I guess if they already know better, the book is closed.

    I wish you good luck, you are fighting tremendous odds!
     
  4. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    mr Rowuk!

    Start breathing!!!

    I agree with you.
    My last post was just a hint to likefoxes to take the trumpet playing seriously if he really wants to learn how to play, and not make himself a lot of trouble by trying to invent the "trumpetwheel" by himself.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hej Norlandstrompet!
    I like your signature, but Trollhättan is in Sweden! I agree with you too!

    Robin
     
  6. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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  7. oj

    oj Pianissimo User

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    Hi Nordlandstrompet !

    I suppose you know that Mick Hesse is coming to Norway this week?

    He will give a little seminar in Oslo (at Barrat Due) on Saturday (May 3 - 2008). It start at 14:00. There he will present his book and conduct some trumpet ensembles.

    Here is an interview I had with Mick: http://abel.hive.no/trumpet/hesse/

    Ole
     
  8. JRFIII

    JRFIII Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2008
    New Jersey
    Likefoxes.
    You've received some strong valid advice here.
    1. Don't use the "smile" method.
    2. Find a PROPER teacher. (post a reply to the thread about where you live, etc. and perhaps someone here can help you find a good one.
    3. If you can't breathe right, a good embouchure only gets you so far.
    If you insist on doing it yourself, let me share something I learned only after I was accepted to music school asa performance major in trumpet after playing since the age of 10 with only maybe 15 lessons, and none of them from a real teacher.
    I wanted to be a scremer like Maynard. And I could play from G to G above high C easily. But my lower register suffered. I had this old guy assigned to me as my personal instructor at school. Long white hair falling all over. Looked alike a 5 ft. one stereotype of the early 20th century classical musician. He was old, old, old. And going slightly senile. But he still knew what he knew. He watched me in the first couple of weeks, realized I was on a limited track. Made me play more long note and lower register studies.
    Man, I was getting buzzing outside the moutnpiece on my lips, especially once I got fatigued. So here is what he taught me:
    1. Lighten up on the pressure against the lips transferred from arm to hand to horn. Don't mash your lip. (Train the lip muscles. If you want stronger arms lift weights, don't force the mouthpiece through your teeth.)
    2. When you start to feel the buzz, remove one hand, while attempting to keep the same amount of pressure with the remaining hand.
    3. Take one finger from the free hand and just barely apply pressure until the buzz stops while playing a sustained note.
    4. Concentrate on how that feels, and think about how to apply your mind to the muscle and close that gap without the finger there.
    5. Repeat and repeat whenever it happens, until your mind trains the muscles.
    This made a tremendous difference in the quality of my playing.
    Although I dropped out of music shool and went into business, that was the BEST advice I ever got. Then when I decided I wanted to get serious again after a 15 year lay-off from playing, remembering his advice helped me get my chops back faster than I would have if I'd never heard it.
     
  9. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    hei oj
    Jeg fikk invitasjon fra Mick Hesse til dette seminaret. Har dessverre ikke mulighet til å reise, men er interessert i å kjøpe boken hans.

    OR
     

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