Embouchure issues

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eisprl, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    Sep 26, 2004
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    Ok so here is the deal,

    I am 23 years old, about to graduate my bachelors and I play with very little upper lip. Is it too late in my life to under go an embouchure change? I need to put more upper lip in. (According to a guy I took a coulpe lessons with last summer).

    I can feel that it would make things easier, but it is way to hard to keep the mp in the center. At this point I am about to go through different auditions and an embouchure change would not be the wisest course of action.

    Just wondering if I am too old to change something so drastic

    This is my embouchure now

    [​IMG]

    This is the embouchure that was suggested to me that I change to

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Sandovalic

    Sandovalic New Friend

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    Jan 20, 2006
    Netherlands
    You are 23 years old and wondering if you are to old to change????? Helloooooow.

    From my point of view the second emboucher is much better. The corners of your mouth are not going up and therefore not thining the upper lip. (correct me if I'm wrong)

    It just takes a while and a bit of concentrating. Braking an old habbit and getting used to a new one. You (like myself (i'm 28) have a whole life ahead. I know a 83 year old trumpeteer who plays lead in a semi-pro Big Band, now that's old :-)


    Olaf
     
  3. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    Understood, I am just at the point right now where if I make a change, it might ruin any chances of winning a job after school.

    E.
     
  4. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

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    Saint Paul, MN
    If you don't do the embouchure change, you will probably be wasting your time at the auditions.
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    I think that a very important question to ask yourself prior to making a switch is this: Is my current embouchure limiting my playing?

    If it's not majorly hindering you in any way such as in range, endurance or tone quality, why make the change simply because you think it might be a better way to go? Why is it that you believe your current setup needs to be changed?

    It's not that I am against change - my embouchure has gone through some changes over the years and much of it happened on it's own. Nothing drastic mind you, but it did change. My mouthpiece position moved up a little, my jaw position has changed (years ago I almost looked like a clarinetist, my horn angle was so low - now my horn is barely tilted) and I don't spread out at the corners as I ascend anymore. I believe the changes were a natural result of a few things -
    Proper practice
    Requirements of the music I was performing (Higher register requiring more endurance.)
    mouthpiece change (again, brought about by the requirements of the music)

    None of the changes were the result of a conscious move toward change.

    Well, good luck with it. I hope you find what you need.
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    I think success is a good motivator for change. That is to say that if you find enough positve points about the change from a sound point of view, you'll be motivated to continue doing what you're doing. I believe that when you change an embouchure there should be an immediate reward of at least a few notes in some register that sound decidedly better that what you were doing before. It is upon those notes that you'll find the motivation to build and improve. Then, you'll take to the change in no time. If, however, there aren't any notes that sound better immediately, you make be making a change for cosmetic reasons. The gratification is not there and it becomes a chore rather than a joy to change.

    Your embouchure reminds me of Gerard Schwarz when he played with the Philharmonic.

    ML
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Yeah, but Manny, why should we take advice from YOU, a "flat-chinner"? ;-)

    Just kidding - I think that Manny presents some great points to think about, especially in terms of sound because many have said that when the sound is happening, so is the embouchure.
     
  8. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    eric,

    Which one feels the most natural? In my mind all the embouchure should do is seal the lips to the mouthpiece.

    The best embouchure changes are ones that are done without thinking about mechanics.
     
  9. dkelley

    dkelley New Friend

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    Jan 16, 2006
    I have to agree with Manny on this. You probably want to have some improvement immediately. Exactly what that is and how much will depend on you. It's definitely not too late to change, but the real question is should you make the change. None of us can tell you without knowing you and how you play.

    I'm not fully convinced that following what feels natural is always the best guide. Remember, the human body/mind will normalize itself to a repeated stimulus. What I mean is, whatever you experience the most will usual feel the most "natural." Therefore, whatever embouchure you have played with the most will almost definitely feel the most natural. That does not mean it will necessarily produce the best trumpet results. I agree that the ideal case would be to change without thinking about mechanics, but I don't know if that is always possible. :dontknow:

    eisprl, what ever you decide. I wish you good luck.
     
  10. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003

    I admit I am being general when I say which is most natural. Perhaps I should have said which set up requires the least amount of manipulation or movement to set.
     

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