embouchure question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jdturbo22, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,125
    9,298
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    May the luck of the Irish be with you, with smiling eyes. Bring that lucky horn with you to little E's when we come to Pittsburgh next Saturday as I plan on putting you to work with the Quintet then as well.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    IMO for two cents worth, and just to clarify for others who may mot know, an "arm strong" player is one who uses his left arm to press their mouthpiece too hard against the lips. At no time should one need to apply such pressure beyond making an air seal between the lips and mouthpiece ... any that do, risk lip injury ... in the extreme as could be permanent.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,459
    7,035
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    Sorry about the chops, jdturbo22. In the best of all possible world, you would take a single lesson from a good teacher, play your sucky low notes, have the teacher emulate that sound and tell you what you are doing wrong.

    Sight (and sound) unseen, I would recommend lots of bends and pedal tones--not only good for the lower register but the upper register as well.

    Good luck!
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,125
    9,298
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    And if they are kneeling when playing like this, while at the same time doing the Michael Jackson Moon crawl, would you call this technique the "Kneel-Arm-Strong"?
     
  5. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

    826
    795
    Sep 6, 2012
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Gmonady, sir. <ahem!>

    My first name is Neal, and I wanted to point out that you have just proposed what is quite possibly the only variation of the Neal/Neil/Kneel pun that I have NOT yet heard in my 35 years on this terrestrial ball.

    Congratulations.

    Now if you'll pardon me, I'm off to go groan in bitter anguish somewhere.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    60
    12,459
    7,035
    Mar 23, 2006
    Parts Unknown
    Could we say, "A Neal is not well tempered?"
     
  7. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

    826
    795
    Sep 6, 2012
    Ft. Worth, TX
    You could say that, yes.

    But then you'd have to come talk me down off the ledge.......
     
  8. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

    333
    77
    Apr 8, 2010
    Massachusetts
    JD,

    Like you, I am a comeback player, but, I am starting my fourth year comeback. I was off for forty five years.This past spring I started reading Claude Gordon's books on "practice", and his "Playing Brass is as Easy as Deep Breathing", both of which has changed my playing. Until then, I had a great sound, but a hesitant phrasing of the music. I also was using my lips to determine pitch, which left me pretty exhausted at the end of practice or band rehearsal. With Claude Gordon's approach, I lightly anchor the tip of my tongue behind my bottom, front teeth, and arch or lower my tongue to determine pitch. My air flows over the top of the tongue. This way, my lower jaw is more relaxed, I can still articulate the notes (legato, staccato, etc.) and my endurance has increased. Last week I played for four hours during the day/ evening.

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    I wouldn't be calling it anything as I don't do it. I don't kneel in church either ... because it is now painful and a problem to stand up again.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,791
    3,555
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    JD, I don't know where you live, but finding solutions to a serious embouchure problem on an internet forum is probably not going to help because we can't hear and assess what's going on. Find the nearest chop-doc - someone who teaches embouchure stuff, preferably a Doc Reinhardt method teacher, but any pro-level player or college high brass professor will likely be able to help, and have them give it a look.

    And it may wind up being more than just a chops issue - if you are collapsing into your current mouthpieces, it's possible that you'll have to move to something else to help compensate if your chops have become permanently damaged.

    Best of luck to you, and welcome to the forum.
     

Share This Page