Embouchure & the Role of the Teeth

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trickg, Sep 5, 2014.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    ... all over again!
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I was addressing only the post that I quoted.
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    did you make any adjustments or decisions yet?
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Nope - not yet. The only decision I have made has been to practice more. :-)
     
  5. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    Trickg- I'm just an average player and my tone has always been thin and bright. I tried different horns mainly Bachs and all kinds of mouth pieces but my bright sound always came back within two weeks. About 15 yrs ago I lost a crown on the lower left side and went to a bridge. All of a sudden my sound changed, I now have a pleasant sound and have added 3 notes to my range. Nothing changed in my practice routine and now play on a Burbank Benge 5 with a Hammond 5s m.p. I have a darker, richer sound on a Benge then any of the Bach 37s I've owned. I firmly believe that your oral cavative has a lot to do with your sound. Grinding your teeth has changed your oral cavity in a small way Good luck, hope you find something that helps..
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I'm not sure if I gave the wrong impression - I started the thread not so much because I was looking for advice, but rather as a forum to chat about the subject of dental work and its relation to trumpet playing and embouchure.

    A semi-personal story I have comes from a friend of mine, a fellow Army bandsman that I knew way back when. When he was a kid, he had some kind of accident that knocked a big chunk out of one of his front teeth - I don't know if this was prior to learning trumpet, or at some point in his developmental years. In any case, he was a solid player all around. At one point in his Army career due both to hot/cold sensitivity to the tooth and for cosmetic reasons, he got it fixed.

    Mistake.

    His playing never recovered from it, and although he contemplated seeing if he could compromise on the dental work and have it re-shaped to what it had been, I don't think he ever did. He wasn't a bad player, but he lost any range he had in the stratosphere and was pretty much relegated to 2nd ledger and below.
     
  7. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    Trickg - this old geezer understands the original post better now and I do know a little about teeth and playing. When I was 12 I caught a croquet ball with my front teeth. I had the gold caps until I was a senior in high school. I usually knocked off one or both caps every couple of months snd every time they were glued back in it affected my playing somewhat. It wasn't until I was halfway through my senior year did I have permanent front teeth.even though the dentist thought the caps were put back exactly they were always slightly different then before and brother could I tell a difference when I played my horn.
     
  8. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    everybody...read the maggio story. google the maggio system. its about a guy who knocked out his teeth.
     
  9. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I have a pinching jaw joint (TMJ) which I'm getting treated with a splint device which will have the additional effect of realigning some crowded teeth. My dentist assured me that not only will it not bother my playing but should in fact improve it. I hope he's right! (I'll know in a few months I suppose.)

    --bumblebee
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    This is good advice - my wife is a grinder as well, and she now uses a "Night Guard" - it stops her snoring as well. So I know if she has left it out, I can hear her... And she has some epoxy material regularly put on the top to preserve them, it is hardly noticeable, and I would think if I had it done it would not change anything. I suppose it depends on the level of wear, but your health is most important, your body will adapt. If you don't rely on the horn for a living, then it makes the decision easier to make on what to do.

    Good Luck
     

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