Embouchure

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by schilkeX4, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. schilkeX4

    schilkeX4 New Friend

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    Hi everyone

    This is the first time I post on this website but i have been reading many great and useful posts.I have a question for Monette players. I have recently read the Prana Mouthpiece FAQ and in one of the paragraphs it talks about how it would be easier to play on the Monette Prana mouthpieces with a ''Loose" embouchure than with a "Tight" embouchure . I was wondering if anyone can explain a Loose and a tight embouchure so I can have a better understanding of both concepts.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't think "loose" or "tight" EMBOUCHURE are correct descriptions. I don't remember seeing them on the site.
    Regardless if you use Monette Prana or not, body tension is your greatest enemy. Spending some time here will reap the greatest benefits. Correct stance, relaxed breathing - all the stuff shown on the Monette body use pages help your playing. If you have major unresolved body tension issues, the Prana will probably not not give you the results that you expect (and think that you paid for). If you have a relaxed approach to playing, the Prana can be an important part of your musical experience. The pitch center thing really works!
    Picking a Prana as your first Monette mouthpiece should only be done if you are working with somebody that understands these body tension issues. I got a class from John Henes (Alexander technique) right at the beginning. That was a great start and a real eye opener on what I wasn't doing correctly!
    Conventional mouthpieces let you get away with more - what the price for that is, is different from player to player. There are many great players not using Monette - but the truly great players have solved most of the tension issues.
     
  3. schilkeX4

    schilkeX4 New Friend

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  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    If you mean this:
    Prana mouthpieces are easier to play and they project better - especially for players who play "loose" enough to let them really work! If you relate to Monette "constant pitch center" equipment, you will most likely love Prana mouthpieces. If you compensate and play "tight," you probably will not!
    I'm pretty sure Dave is talking about the body.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The loose and tight do not refer to the embouchure, but to body tension. This is explained in great detail in the body use link a little further down in that paragraph.

    Basically, there are millions of combinations to "get the notes out". Bad habits including breathing, posture, even how you place your feet. If anything about your playing is not correct, there are many options to compensate - tension, pressure, alternate fingerings even pivoting the horn.

    If you do not have these issues resolved or are at least well on your way, you probably won't have much fun with the Prana - the standard Monette mouthpiece would be more forgiving.

    The octaves on the Prana are further apart than on other mouthpieces. If you are tense, this would make you flat in the lower register and sharp in the high register. As your body learns to cooperate, everything starts to line up. The end result is an in tune, resonant sound with a lot of dynamics and color. Just like there are student and pro horns, there is a choice between "forgiving" and high performance mouthpieces.

    The body use section of the Monette website says it all. The less your body is in the way of your playing, the easier time you will have with ANY professional equipment. When your body is in the way, you need more "forgiving" equipment. "Forgiving" is not the most "resonant" approach!

    How do you know in advance if you are "loose" enough? Find a hatha yoga teacher and take a couple of lessons. In a very short time you will be aware of everything we are talking about! It would be money very well spent and would apply to any type of professional playing with all types of great equipment.

    This should not sound like a Prana ad, rather be motivation for everyone to loosen up when playing. Regardless of your horn and mouthpiece you will benefit. I am sold on Monettes concept. As we are creatures of habit, it is not always possible or desirable to change equipment, however.
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Good catch, Jerry. I was wondering when I saw the post and couldn't remember any reference to embouchure regarding Prana mouthpieces.

    ML
     
  7. Adam Smith

    Adam Smith Pianissimo User

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    speaking of resonance...do your arm positions affect your resonance? I have heard that you should tuck your left arm against your body and that helps your resonance and I have hear that you should play with your elbows out away from your body? I just play with my arms where they are comftorable.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Anything that raises body tension will ultimately affect resonance.
    Check out the videos on the Monette web site. There are a bunch of relaxed dudes making great music with equipment that demands good body use.
    Then go to YouTube and check the finest players. Same thing!
    I do not thing that tucking one arm in is beneficial.
    The body use pages on the Monette site are universal. That approach will better your playing regardless of brand of instrument or mouthpiece!
     
  9. Siegtrmpt

    Siegtrmpt Mezzo Piano User

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    The site doesn't actually come out and say it but the point I get is that it really doesn't make sense to spend money on custom equipment unless you have your act together as a player.
     

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