Endurance Efficiency

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by MahlerBrass, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

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    Oct 1, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Hello Mr. Laureano, the "Gimme some bricks" thread got me thinking of something that I saw at a masterclass last year by a very fine trumpet players, and that I've actually heard more than once. He stated that by keeping everything "forward" and being totally efficient he would be able to play all day without ever getting tired, and he claimed to prove that point one time by playing for 14 hours straight one night then going to play a show that same day. I try to be as efficient as I can every time I pick up the horn, but I can't imagine not being tired after say a concert playing Mahler 1, Bruckner 7, and Pictures, or even 14 hours of playing. What I'm trying to say is, do you feel that the efficiency to the level that you guys play at makes your endurance that "unstoppable", or is it the practice time and playing time spent in getting to that efficiency level? Thanks a lot Mr. Laureano.
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    "... by keeping everything "forward" and being totally efficient he would be able to play all day without ever getting tired, and he claimed to prove that point one time by playing for 14 hours straight one night then going to play a show that same day."

    Sorry, I don't buy it. There's playing and there's playing. I want to hear the quality of sound after three hours and then I'll be convinced.

    "I try to be as efficient as I can every time I pick up the horn, but I can't imagine not being tired after say a concert playing Mahler 1, Bruckner 7, and Pictures, or even 14 hours of playing."

    That's because you're sane.

    "What I'm trying to say is, do you feel that the efficiency to the level that you guys play at makes your endurance that "unstoppable", or is it the practice time and playing time spent in getting to that efficiency level?"

    Everybody has a limit. Some are higher than others. When you slap down good money to come to Orchestra Hall, I'm sure as hell not going to disappoint you if it's in my control. Having said that, it's about strength coming from a stable embouchure, good control of the breath, and constant challenging of oneself in the practice room regarding endurance.

    The lips fold when the strength in the corners gives out. Keeping things "forward" is a critical part of the stable embouchure but so is proper weakness of the respiratory muscles. Tense abs, no air. Loose abs, lots of air. "Strength is my enemy, weakness is my friend" was the Jacobs mantra and he was right. Period. I'm a living testament to that philosophy.

    Mental attitude is important, as well. You have to have a bit of ego to play the trumpet at a high level. Just make sure it's only present when you're playing. When you put your horn in the case, the ego you need for the playing goes in with it.

    ML

    BTW,

    Fourteen hours of playing followed by playing a show:

    get up at 5:30, have breakfast, shower, etc. start playing by 6 am, finish at 8pm and go to a what? 9pm gig, let's say? I don't think so.
     
  3. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

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    Oct 1, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Thanks a lot Mr. Laureano, I really didn't buy it myself, but I wasn't about to question a professional trumpet player in front of several other trumpet players as a mere college student. Thanks again!!
     
  4. sdgtpt

    sdgtpt New Friend

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    Dec 3, 2004
    Wasn't that masterclass given by John Holt of the Dallas Opera/UNT???
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    I knew a guy named Brian Tomlinson who had incredible range and endurance. I NEVER saw him get tired or chop out. Not even when I went and heard him play a Latin Band gig where he was in the double and tripple octaves constantly. For him, it was as if the longer he played, the stronger and more powerful he got. It was almost freakish. I have mentioned him before here - he's the guy that I knew where the first time I asked him to demonstrate some of his prowess of range, blew the clearest, cleanest double high C I have ever heard...on a Bach 1 1/2 C mouthpiece...on a Bb bugle...with no warmup. He had total control over it - he could play it soft if he wanted to, but he could also part your hair with it.

    Brian was a proponent of the controversial Superchops method, and whether or not it was actually Superchops, it worked for him. Two of the claims that have always been made about Superchops are effortless range and vastly improved endurance. He had both to spare.

    Do I think that Brian could have done a 14 hour practice day and then gone and played a show at night? I don't know that he would have ever gone out of his way to practice for 14 hours, but I do think that he could have practiced for much of the day, possibly played a couple of Army band gigs, and then had the same kind of range and endurance at an evening gig.

    The only area where I thought Brian could improve was his sound. If he was screaming double octave stuff, like in a big band, rock band or Latin Band environment, his sound was perfect, but I'm not sure how well he would have fit in to a legit environment and I never really heard him play in that sort of setting.

    I thought that I would toss that up here because I do believe that there are some freakish people where playing is so efficient and effortless for them, they really have no endurance problems where there chops are concerned. I think that Brian's arms and shoulders would have given out from holding up his horn before his chops would have.
     

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