endurance, tonequality dillema

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jeroen Jongeling, Jan 5, 2005.

  1. Jeroen Jongeling

    Jeroen Jongeling Pianissimo User

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    Nov 10, 2003
    Amsterdam!!!
    Hi there Mr. Laureano,

    As a classical freelance trumpet player, I've been struggling with one big dillema my whole career now. I can't seem to find a mpc. that will give me a bigger sound then my Bach 1-1/2C and, at the same time, won't cost me my endurance. I've always been very comfortable on the Bach 1-1/2C, it just seems to be the mpc for me (rim shape, diameter, all good!). I've tried lots of mpcs that are a little bigger (various 1-1/4C's and 1C's), but, in the end, I always keep coming back to the 1-1/2C Bach. Do you have any suggestions?

    Thanks, Jeroen
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "As a classical freelance trumpet player, I've been struggling with one big dillema my whole career now. I can't seem to find a mpc. that will give me a bigger sound then my Bach 1-1/2C and, at the same time, won't cost me my endurance. I've always been very comfortable on the Bach 1-1/2C, it just seems to be the mpc for me (rim shape, diameter, all good!). I've tried lots of mpcs that are a little bigger (various 1-1/4C's and 1C's), but, in the end, I always keep coming back to the 1-1/2C Bach. Do you have any suggestions?"

    Dear Jeroen,

    I'm not sure I see a problem.

    For what it's worth, when I played Bach equipment many years ago I played the 1 1/2 C and it was a good mouthpiece for me. I moved to larger sizes because I wanted to see what my limits were and I moved a quarter size at a time until I reached a point where the high register was not reliable and then I went one step back. For my case I stopped at the 1B set up based on what I heard about Bud Herseth's set up. That was plenty comfortable until I started to play Dave's mouthpieces. I had the same cup depth but greater clarity and brilliance and more fundamental. I knew I was on the right track because the violas were complaining more!

    The point is that perhaps you have found the ideal size and if you have you are in a better position than the majority of trumpeters! If your lips are thinner than mine then you should be able to produce a sound that is robust enough to keep up with another good player playing comparable equipment.

    So, Jeroen, we're all jealous of you! You have found your mouthpiece niche early in life.

    ML
     
  3. Jeroen Jongeling

    Jeroen Jongeling Pianissimo User

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    Nov 10, 2003
    Amsterdam!!!
    Thanks for your quick reply Mr. Laureano, However:

    Although I don't feel I have to play bigger, I think I can and should sound a bit broader/bigger/more symphonic then I do right now. Maybe I'll try a 1-1/2C with a more open backbore. In a few months I'm going back to my horn manufacturer and look at my horn setup. Maybe that will get me where I want, soundwise.

    Regarding that mouthpiece niche I've found: Let's hope so. That only leaves the quest for the best horn! :D

    Jeroen.


    BTW: I play a Hub van Laar C3 trumpet: http://www.hubvanlaar.nl
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Forte User

    1,099
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    Oct 21, 2003
    I checked out the website of the horn you are playing on. Looks like a cool shop! :-)

    [​IMG]


     
  5. Jeroen Jongeling

    Jeroen Jongeling Pianissimo User

    57
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    Nov 10, 2003
    Amsterdam!!!
    Yeah, it's always nice to be there and check out his horns. He's a very gifted craftsman and a very nice guy. His horns are up and coming. Check out all the pro guys that are playing his flugelhorns (Bob and Chuck Findley for instance)!
     
  6. Rick Chartrand

    Rick Chartrand Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Dear Jeroen Jongeling

    Im not sure whether you want to deeper darker broader sound by mouthpiece or equipment change. But in either case your delema is much like mine was. I am a freelance street busker I wanted a horn in the $1500 range and naturally chose the Martin Committee because of its deep dark rich sound and it was the horn my idol Miles Davis played. To further the development of this sound I was displeased with the standard Holton mouthpiece that came with the Martin so I searched and switched to a Monette mouthpiece, and that gave me the edge I needed. The mpc I am using is the Monette Stc1-B4 which is the equivilent of a 1c. Also when I was auditioning the martin Committe I tried a horn that was had even a broader darker more focused sound with tons of projection. It Was a Courtois Evolution Trumpet. If I'd have had the extra money I would have bought this horn, but was about $1000 short. The Monette mouthpieces are a little expensive but they are worth the investment! As for your quest for the best horn if you can afford it, try a Monette Anja 2 Prana. I have not had the pleasure of trying one of these babies but if you want to hear one at its best glory listen to Wynton Marsalis CD standard time, that he cut with his dad on piano. Now theres a horn!!! A word of warning. Monetts are hand made and have a waiting list of one year, and this particular horn I recomended is about $9500 on a cheap day. Have a look at them at www.monette.net Good Hunting, and let me know what you come up with :-)

    Rick AKA Trumpet Man
     
  7. Jeroen Jongeling

    Jeroen Jongeling Pianissimo User

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    Nov 10, 2003
    Amsterdam!!!
    Dear Rick,

    Buying Monette equipment is not an option for me.

    I'm very satisfied with the Hub van Laar horns. For me it's just a matter of tweaking the setup of my horn-mouthpiece combination.

    I've set my sights on a new Bach 1-1/2C with symphonic backbore (I believe that's the 24) and try that first with my horn. If that doesn't work, I'm going to Hub and do some tweaking and testing.
     
  8. Rick Chartrand

    Rick Chartrand Piano User

    386
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    Nov 22, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Dear Jeroen

    As I can imagine buying a Monette isn't an option for a lot of people (me included) :-( Your choice of a Bach 1 1/2c with a symphonic backbore is a good one. Most manufacturers use the Bach as a measuring post for thier mouthpieces. If you dont want to try a Monette mouthpiece. I think youre on the right track! Good luck!

    Rick AKA Trumpet Man
     
  9. R.A.S.

    R.A.S. Pianissimo User

    Age:
    60
    165
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    Oct 13, 2004
    Woodbury, Minnesota
    Jeroen
    I just had to kick in an opinion here.
    If you haven't tried the Monette mouthpieces in the C-1 to C-4 range, I think you owe it to yourself. This would include the C1-5, C1-5M, C1-2, C-2, C-3, and C-4. (The C1-1 is huge!)
    You might need to have your repairman adjust the receiver on your C trumpet to get the right gap, but you did say that you wanted to find the best mouthpiece-horn combination.
    Short of buying one of those wonderful Monette horns, this solution has worked for me, with a C1-5M mouthpiece and a Callet C trumpet.
    There's my 2 cents worth.
    Ray
     
  10. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

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    Oct 1, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Hey Jeroen, I've actually struggled with the same problem, difference was I was playing on a Bach 1C. The thing that I found as my "lifesaver" is trying out different backbore and throat combinations. I'm currently playing on a Bach 1 1/2C with a 23 throat and a 117 backbore, and it's the greatest mouthpiece that I've played on yet. This is the same set-up used my Mr. Sachs with the Cleveland Orchestra, and it worked really well for me. Try messing around with those, I also know that a pretty popular combination is the 24 throat with 24 backbore. Good luck on your search, it took me a while to find mine!!
     

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