Endurance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Heavens2kadonka, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Anyone here ever go on a benge where you come here, but just can't think of ANYTHING to post!?!? :D

    Anyways, dcstep, your tips have helped much in my playing, I've never heard of using soft-playing exercises before (Then again, I haven't had any real "professional" trumpet instructors..), so thanks again!

    Now, I must know! What do you find improves your endurance? I can muster out about 45 minutes, with two-three breaks, if I do about 15 minutes of slurs and arpeggios through my register, so I am curious how other approach endurance exercise (I beginning to think a method of "play the hell out of everything" does much to improve, or maybe I just haven't really started focusing on trumpet until now. Attitude seems to have much to do with the result.....)
     
  2. trpguyy

    trpguyy Piano User

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    I find my endurance to be much stronger when I'm fully warmed-up. Find a good warm-up routine. Mine takes about 30 minutes. Also, playing more will help strengthen your endurance. Make sure you're playing correctly, don't "cheat" for the high notes when you're practicing. If you don't have them that day, don't kill yourself trying for them. Also, don't play too long after your chops are shot.

    When you practice, do everything correctly. When you're performing, do whateber you need to get the notes out.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Personally, I find that if I warm up first, then put the horn away for about 20 - 30 minutes before I come back and practice, (or perform) that always seems to help me the most overall, and my endurace is much better than if I just pick up the horn and go without taking the break.
     
  4. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

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    Your embouchure is a set of muscles. It is funny that no one with any sense would go out and run hard for 5 miles without warming up, stretching, etc. Yet musicians do that way too often. Play a scale and then let it rip.

    Warm up is important. A good warm up includes some rest (I rest a few minutes rather than 20 or 30, but whatever works!).

    Probably the most neglected part of any routine is a the "warm down". Playing a routine similar to the warm up helps the embouchure muscles relax and thus helps prevent damage and builds strength. I do not warm down often enough and often I pay for it later. Especially after a long rehearsal -- who wants to warm down? But even 5 minutes will make a difference or easy buzzing on the way home in your mouthpiece.

    Jim
     
  5. Castle Bravo

    Castle Bravo Piano User

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    The BIGGEST leap in my endurance improvement happened when I started the day playing a top space g; I then used that lip setting to play EVERYTHING else. Do a search and I'll bet you will come up with a lot on this one...
     
  6. Veldkamp

    Veldkamp Piano User

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    You've to rest the same length of time as you're practicing. Take a half hour break after a half hour practicing etc.

    I've noticed that my embouchure improved a lot with staccato excercises, that's why I wrote a new staccato book to help with my practicing. It helps with your sound and speeds up the tongue and you get a better endurance.
     
  7. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    Thanks for the complement at the start of this thread. I'm not a pro, but 46-years of successful playing, plus lessons from a couple of world-class teachers give me something to share.

    Warm up is good, BUT I think a lot of time is wasted warming up incorrectly. In my warmup, I do some of the Balanced Embouchure double-pedal routines, moving in and out of the double-pedal register and focusing on intonation between registers and a real "pop" as I slur up into the mid, then upper registers.

    This takes only a minute or two, but my attention is on focus. Are the notes really resonating; am I hitting the center of the pitches; can I effortlessly go up to high-C? If that doesn't seem to be working, I do some leadpipe buzzing and go back to the slurs and attention to embouchure focus (some very wise peope START with leadpipe buzzing. I don't but perhaps should if I were REALLY smart).

    Ok, assuming my embouchure is focused and accurate, with proper breath support and all cylinders working, then I play up to G over high-C softly, to assure that I hear that note and hit it with "minimal" work (there IS high effort here, but for me I've found the right amount of effort). If that's working, then I try to play that G really loud for a few seconds.

    All this took less than five-minutes. NEXT, and this may be the most important step, I PUT THE HORN DOWN for five-minutes.

    Coming back to the horn, if I'm doing technical studies, I continue to pay attention to focus. If you're hitting the notes accurately, then effort drops and endurance increases. If I start getting ragged, then I put the horn down for a few minutes before continuing.

    Putting the horn down often mimics a lot of live playing situations (graduate recitals excepted -- that kind of endurance takes years of hard work), where you stop and start a lot. Learning to let your lips quickly recover quickly, re-focus and then start again is VERY important.

    Whisper-quiet practice puts attention on focus and, therefore, increases both endurance and range.

    Dave
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    You know what? (And I'm being absolutely serious here) I have been giving a considerable amount of thought to bagging playing trumpet completely, and spending my energies behind the drum kit.

    I'll tell you why.

    NOT ONCE in the time that I have been playing drums since I started back up last September have I ever had to worry about range, endurance, wonder if I was going to chop out before the gig was done, or wonder if I was going to have a good chops day in general. Behind the drums, it just doesn't matter. I suppose if I ever played a four hour gig straight, I might get a little tired, but not in the same way as playing trumpet.

    In my career as a trumpet player, both when I was an Army Bandsman and playing freelance on the side, I have always had "problems" with range and endurance. Some might say "you just need to work on your embouchure". That might be true, but it's also easier said than done.

    As of late, due to my schedule and the lack of practice time I have, I have been increasingly frustrated and unsatisfied with my trumpet playing because of those limitations. I have none of that playing drums and I get a tremendous amount of satisfaction playing them, even if it is only for a rock praise band on Sunday mornings.

    Just random thoughts this morning.
     
  9. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Trickg,

    I...Don't wanna work! I wanna bang on the drums all day!

    Come on! How many of you read trickg's post and thought of that song (Nobody? NOBODY!?!? Hmph...)?

    Just being silly. I always wanted to learn drums, and especially guitar (I STILL entertain notions of becoming a music therapist). Of course, I don't really have the time to divide between instruments, and I have no one to formally teach me, let alone the money to support it.

    Of course, I will have to eventually learn other instruments if I continue with my major...

    *Shudders at the horror of holding a woodwind, and represses tears*

    Dcstep

    I REALLY think the mistake a lot of people make while practicing is the laying the horn down part. Maybe they (Who am I kiding? WE!) think that if you can play for so-long at one time, it makes you overall stronger, when the truth is you won't be playing so freakishly long in a real-life musical situation until you start doing big college recitals (Actually have done an hour-and-a-half quintet recital in a packed church. Was a real eye-opening experience, I think every high school student should do at least one mini-recital before deciding whether to go into music in college, or join the underwater basket-weaving team :D ). Playing in large, unbreaked intervals only tires your chops, and hurts them in the long run (In retrospect, this has been one of my biggest errors in playing, I remember practicing one hour on Mondays, then a few painful minutes the rest of the week. How did that help!?!?). I think this will be one of my new changes in practice routine. 15-20 minute warmup (Start increasing the length, since more warm-up seems to help the overall endurance!), with a short break, then start practicing, breaking, etc..... BRILLIANT!

    Also, the effort/endurance remark rings hecka true. The Hering advanced studies went from "WTF, this sucks!" in the beginning, to where I can start playing my more favored exercises (2, 17 and 18) several times in a pracice before I start feeling the burn (I also need to start recording again, but I need a friggen' ENGINEER to work the machine!).

    Wow, for every improvement I seem to make, there's ten new changes that must be made!! Not that I really mind, I haven't been frustrated at anything music-wise for quite some time (Maybe I've evened out in temperment, or "matured," as you old farts say :D )!

    VeldKamp,

    Thats most definitely one of the next things I must work on. If there's one thing thats always irked me, it's my single tonguing, especially staccato. Always sounded a bit too "Mickey Mouse Band" to me. I've been told that one should make "Even the short notes sound long," but I kind of have a hard time envisioning that! Maybe one of you gurus here can help me out on the visions here (Had enough of the naked indian guiding me through the desert! WHO KEEPS SENDING THAT VISION TO ME!!!??! *Glaring at Music and Character* :D )

    BTW, Music and Character,

    Yeah, I could be reprimanded for my improper warm down ( Arpeggios from low C to a few pedals and saying "Whoop, me done!"), but I AM trying. Maybe I should put a post-it note on the inside of my case, reminding me to do so....

    Castle Bravo,

    Playing everything with one set embochure? Something I must try! (I would search, but what terms should I use? Set-embochure? Is it a certain pedagogy with an impressive title?)

    Trpguyy,

    Amen on that saying, brother!

    I think thats everyone?! Wonder if I compete for "Longest reply ever"? Mwahaha, one step closer to global domination!
     
  10. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    I'll pile onto CastleBravo's recommendation for setting the embouchure at the G on top of the staff. That does wonders. I learned that from "Pops". Through Balanced Embouchure, I've moved to a slight variation of that, but I still basically set my embouchure for that G (not middle space G, or, heaven forbid, low C).

    Dave
     

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