Endurance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Heavens2kadonka, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. Castle Bravo

    Castle Bravo Piano User

    270
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    Nov 6, 2003
    Scheßlitz, Germany
    Dont over think it. Pick up the horn, set for a top space g, play it, mp-mf. hold the note, slur down to the 2nd line g and play a scale up to the top space g. Your set. Its that simple. It develops consistency, and it is a minor adjustment. Before you play ANY passage, set for the top space g, and then play whatever it is you had planned to play, even if its a low c; (keep in mind, once your set, mpc to the face, you can relax muscles, drop the jaw, whatever you need to do to get the lower stuff out).
    When I first tried this It made such a dramatic improvement within about 1 week that I was almost embarrased to tell anyone. As near as I can tell it encourages an ever so slightly more closed setting, but does it in a way that is not foreign to you or radical; I'm sure you've played a top space g before....
    So many times players set for the first note they see, and when it comes time to jump from a low c to a high c, they have to do a 2 octave jump; with this approach, your lips default setting, if you will, is the G below high c already, so it feels incredibly like a 4th jump instead of a 2 octave jump. I cannot stress how simple an adjustment this is, and the dividends you will reap from it; not just endurance, but supple, fresh chops at the end of an otherwise greuling gig. Your chops won't feel like two blobs of hard rubber, but more like two fine tipped paint brushes still able to articulate perfectly...
    If anyone else can elaborate please do, I'm guessing more people out there do this or have at least heard of it....
     
  2. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

    736
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    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    This works very well for me. I use Paul Archibald's 'Breathe!' book as my warmup (altered a bit with some Caruso), and that's what it consists of.
    http://www.paularchibald.co.uk/pages/sales.php?type=2
     
  3. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Lebanon, TN
    Hmmm!? So basically instead of setting up with, say, a low G, and having to work to push the not to the higher range, you START with the higher range, and it's easier to gauge down... Sounds small, but that'll be a mind-blowing change to how I start my day! Heck, if it even improves ONE note, it's worth it, right :D ?

    Of course, I can't exactly hit the high G you guys spoke of (Damn damn double damn!), so I guess I'll start with the C...
     
  4. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
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    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Yeah, middle-C is better than low-C. Later you can move up to top-space-E and later the G. (I think G is about ideal).

    Dave
     
  5. pops

    pops Pianissimo User

    70
    8
    Mar 17, 2004
    Dallas
    Lip set point.

    Take line 1 of page 125 in the Arban. It is a C Major scale with every other note jumping down to low G.

    If you start on the Low G the middle c is hard for some players. IN fact many people will sound thin and under pitch before they even get to the middle c. (3 different people so far this week in my lessons.)

    If you set (and play) a middle c first and then start the exercise then higher notes are easy. This is after all the setting you started at. The mouthpiece pinned the lips at this setting and you just relaxed to play the low notes.


    I make my students do a 2 octave C scale. They set and play a G on top of the staff and withOUT resetting they start the exercise.

    It is easy to compress the lips to play a half an octave higher than your set point. (The high c.) It is easier to compress and get the High G (only an octave away from the set point.) It is easy to learn to relax to get to a full low g.

    The G on top of the Staff should ALWAYS be your starting point. That way you have a base from which to judge where every note is in relation to your starting aperture/tension level.

    If G is not easy for you yet then use 3rd space C as your set point. Go up to the G when you can.

    Don't use a higher set point. (Come on trumpet players often go overboard.) Trying to use setpoints higher than this tend to give really poor results with low notes. And some people even try to set so high that they can't play a decent middle c. THis is useless.
    You have to play the full range of the instrument and it is much better if done on 1 setting.


    This is far more than just something to get more endurance. It keeps your sound constant in all registers. I hear lots of players who play 30+ different embouchure settings. They set for whatever the first note is.
    If it is a low note then as they play higher they get thin and below pitch. If the first note was a high one then they play low notes above pitch.

    Having 1 and only 1 set point makes everything solid. The sound stays the same and you gain consistency because you learn exactly how every notes feels. You also learn how every interval feels and you stop missing notes.



    The other way every note feels different because you are always setting at a different tension level and lip aperture.

    This is one reason why some players can always nail notes and others may or may not hit them. It is also why many players can play 2 octave scales down well but not ascending. Setting higher helps but setting low they can't cut it.


    And don't forget the soft practice. There is a REASON why EVERY exercise in the Clarke Technical study book is marked pp. Aperture and breath control is important.
     
  6. Castle Bravo

    Castle Bravo Piano User

    270
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    Nov 6, 2003
    Scheßlitz, Germany
    Thanx Pops! :) Nice to hear from you again!!
     
  7. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    Okay, since doing the balanced embochure technique (I generally use the second octave C to start, but on my poorer days, I start on the G), I have managed to start hitting an E in practices, which I have never hit before!

    (Interruption question: When you hit a higher note for the first time, is it normal to feel like your diaphragm is pulling up? Just checking, it hasn't bothered me since..)

    Of course, at the moment I can only get the E if I slur from C, and I can only make it sound decent on my Kanstul, my strad wants to squeal it... As a plus, I can hit the F at least one time every other practice (AN EXTREME STEP-UP!! Another improvement is being able to pick up the horn and play a high C...)!

    Pops

    Excellent point, I have always been taught to set on the first note of what you are starting on (and have wondered why the hell we do it, it never seemed to help much!). Consistency IS the name of the game, and your point is very well-taken!
     
  8. trpguyy

    trpguyy Piano User

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    Nov 26, 2003
    Alright, this is getting a tad bit confusing. Which E and F are you talking about? E on the staff, or E with 3 ledger lines?
     
  9. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Ledger line E.
     
  10. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

    1,097
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    Nov 2, 2003
    Man this seems like a thread from embouchurefanatics.com ugh…. I mean trumpetherald.com. x number of role in’s divided by y number of pedal notes equal good player. :roll:

    I really hope no one will take my sarcasm the wrong way, it is just a lot of what i have read on this thread seems gimmicky.
     

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