English Slide Trumpets

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TopGun, May 21, 2008.

  1. TopGun

    TopGun Pianissimo User

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    Oct 28, 2003
    Hello all,

    I'm looking for a little info on traditional English slide trumpets. What would have been in popular use in the 19th cen. The main two questions I have is what was the most popular key of the instruments and what notes could they not play. I think I understand they could lower the notes of the overtone series by up to 3 half steps. So what I really need to know is what the fundamental is or just a chart of the notes possible.

    Thanks in advance if anyone has any information on this.
     
  2. mattdalton

    mattdalton Pianissimo User

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    Apr 30, 2005
    Newcastle, WA USA
    I have a book that might have that information, but I don't have access to it right now. The book is "The Last Trumpet: A Survey of the History and Literature of the English Slide Trumpet" by Art Brownlow.

    PM me if no one else provides the answer and I'll look through the book to see what I can find.
     
  3. oj

    oj Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2005
    Norway
    One person to ask is Crispian Steele-Perkins.

    I did an iterview with him about his CD "The Regent's Bugle".

    The Regent's Bugle

    About these instruments Crispian says
    Ole
     
  4. oj

    oj Pianissimo User

    93
    2
    Sep 9, 2005
    Norway
  5. TopGun

    TopGun Pianissimo User

    184
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    Oct 28, 2003
    Thanks for the information guys. I really appreciate it. Is that a direct quote from CSP?
     
  6. oj

    oj Pianissimo User

    93
    2
    Sep 9, 2005
    Norway
    Yes.

    Go to CSP's website. There you can post your question to him.

    Crispian Steele-Perkins: Homepage

    Ole

    P.S. If he can give you info on this, also tell us!
     
  7. mattdalton

    mattdalton Pianissimo User

    144
    3
    Apr 30, 2005
    Newcastle, WA USA
    I finally got my book ("The Last Trumpet: A Survey of the History and Literature of the English Slide Trumpet" by Art Brownlow) out and did a little reading.

    The instruments were pitched in F, but usually had additional crooks to make it possible to play in other keys. A web search yielded this site about the slide trumpet, which describes it better than I have.
    "The standard English slide trumpet was in F, with crooks to lower the pitch to E, Eb, D or C (or by combining crooks, to Db, B, Bb or A) and had sufficient length in the slide to lower the pitch of open notes by a semitone or, in some instances, by a whole tone."​

    With the fundamental changing based on the crooks used, any chart would obviously be based on the key of the fundamental. Most slide movement would be to correct out-of-tune partials (e.g. 11th, 13th) or to lower any partial a half or even whole step for musical effect. The lower the fundamental, the longer the instrument, and the more extension required to move a whole step. Depending on the instrument, whole tone shifts may not be possible in lower keys. The book notes that Thomas Harper Jr.'s "School for the Trumpet" publication of 1875 limited whole tone shifts to the key of D and higher.

    I wish I had one of these instruments and could speak from direct experience rather than simply study of the text. The book is certainly a worthwhile purchase for anyone with an interest in the slide trumpet . It has many musical examples, descriptions of various designs, historical contexts, lists of players, etc.
     

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