Enhancing Trumpet Playing with Dental Architecture

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by talcito, Apr 1, 2005.

  1. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Lets get back to dentistry.
    We have been through this before on earlier threads.

    I am entirely in favor of orthodontics to straighten teeth. Grade school students should have their teeth straightened as soon as the dentist and orthodontist agree. You cannot go wrong having the health benefits of straight teeth. Don't get into a hissy fit with the dentist as to how the front teeth should be to play trumpet. Gaps aren't necessary, the dentist won't put them in as it reflects poorly on his work. A wide dental arch is best as opposed to a pointed arch but it has more to do with bone structure than choice.

    There are thousands of trumpet players learning to play with braces every year and thousands adapting to when the braces come off. The appliance that comes later can be worse but should be removed when practicing and performing.

    IF you elect to have braces as a professional I doubt if it would effect you much. A proper embouchure such as what the trumpet masters use is very robust and can adapt to the slow change in tooth structure over time.

    I also have bonded repairs. Long ago my dentist kirfed my teeth and bonded in plastic facias. That is what you see on the web site. My current dentist reworks the facias as they chip or disbond after 20 years.

    I don't have any problem adapting to bonded facias.

    As for gum work I don't have a clue. Trimming gums is done when crowns are installed. That is the most experience I have had. Trimming gums in the front is not usually necessary and probably a result of gum disease.
     
  2. Adam Smith

    Adam Smith Pianissimo User

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    I think it would be cool to see the results of those tests he offers on my own face.
     
  3. EdMann

    EdMann Mezzo Forte User

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    Harry James played fine after have all his teeth removed and replaced with dentures, just changed his approach. Maynard CLOSED his gap with crowns, made the adjustment. A gap or a V might make things easier from the get, but you've got to have the tools in the shed and spend some time in there as well.

    Brush your teeth and practice.

    Ed Mann
    MySpace.com - Ed - 51 - Male - LA, California - www.myspace.com/jazzlips
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    If you think we trumpeters have problems getting into the high range above the stave, consider my first born - he plays a tuba.

    :lol:

    Ted (heh! heh! heh!)
     
  5. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jack Teagarden, the trombone player didn't have his teeth.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    How perverted has our society become? Anabolic Steroids to play better sports, breast implants to optimize the experience and tooth and gum surgery to "improve" our playing (or at least improve the apologetic smile after a train wreck.)
    Nope, NONE of these things makes us a better person or a better musician! None of these things brings us closer to our dreams, they only distort our perspective of who and what we are. That reality seems to be more than some people can accept. I hope that doctors teeth fall out!
     
  7. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Yor teeth are like your mouthpiece - sometimes you just have to learn to play with what you have. (Please don't read anything into that).

    Ted ;-)
     
  8. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Your statement is not accurate at all in the United States. Orthodontics for children is now the norm, not the exception. Employers offer partial payments to reduce the cost. Parents put out a lot of money so their children can have straight teeth and good life long dental health. Many adults are getting orthodontics along with their children when the employer starts a new program. Yes, it does improve self esteem.

    When I got out of college 30 years ago my fellow new hires jumped on the orthodontics benefit and got their teeth straightened. Most were in their mid 20's.

    The bonding is also a great advancement. Not all children inherit white teeth. The bonding solves that problem very well.
    (In the U.S. some rural areas have excessive minerals in the well water that cause tooth mottling. Also, there is a generation of adults who were exposed to tetracycline in utero and have brown teeth.)

    From what I have seen in my limited travels, the Europeans could latch on to some good orthodontics.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I am not talking about orthodontics, I am only talking about changing tooth, gum and jaw geometry in hopes that one can play better.
    Germany is very high in the percentage of kids with braces. Whether or not this will decrease tooth disease will need to be seen.I have 4 kids - 2 needed "help". The dentist wanted them to stop playing...................
     
  10. gpatterson

    gpatterson New Friend

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    I had bonding done to my two front teeth about 20 years ago. This made a big difference in my tone quality. I also went to Duquesne.
     

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