Etudes exclusively for the C trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ponce, Jan 18, 2005.

  1. ponce

    ponce New Friend

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    Nov 9, 2003
    New York
    Does such a book exist, that is to say, written specifically to be practiced on the C trumpet? Obviously when one practices the front part of the Arban book or the Schlossberg daily drills on the C, he does so for chop building and technique, and he isn't concerned about what key Arban may have intended. But as we get towards the back of the book, what do you do about Arban's Characteristic Studies? Play them as written, or transpose down a whole tone to comply with the original key? Cafarelli and Sachse are a no brainer (HA!) in that you just transpose them to all the indicated keys no matter which horn you have in your hands, but what about you yourself, Manny? You who are primarily a C trumpet player these days. If you say to yourself: I am really in the mood to play some Charlier #2, and you want to play it on your main trumpet, the C trumpet, would your first note be a Concert F natural, or a Concert Eb? When playing etudes on your C trumpet, does your integrity lean towards the original intent of the key, or towards the fingerings and dexterities that Arban (or whomever) may have had in mind?
     
  2. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Los Angeles, CA
    Many of the French etude books are for C or Bb trumpet. Tomasi, Chaynes, Bozza, Narcisse Bizet, Boutry, Falk, Ballay, Bodet. There are more, but those were the ones on the shelf sitting next to me.

    Kevin
     
  3. blutch

    blutch Pianissimo User

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    Dec 25, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    Tomasi, Chaynes and Bozza wrote etude books? Tell me more.

    MA
     
  4. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Los Angeles, CA
    Tomasi - 6 Etudes (Has Tryptic from the wynton recording)
    Chaynes - 15 Etudes (out of print)
    Bozza - Graphismes, 16 Etudes

    All Leduc...

    oh another for C trumpet is Bitsch
     
  5. blutch

    blutch Pianissimo User

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    Dec 25, 2004
    Oklahoma City
    Thanks man. I have Tryptich by itself and I have the bitsch, but none of the others. I'll have to go on a search. I love their solo works.

    Thanks

    MA
     
  6. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Los Angeles, CA
    Also, the transposition books are nice on C (since I do most of my trasposition on that horn anyway). Bordogni, Caffarelli, Sachse, Concone, et al.
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Dear Ponce,

    I think all these answers are right on their respective marks. The good thing about playing the more familiar etudes (Arban's, etc.) is that you're likely to focus on the usual intonation problems that plague C trumpets because you're ear will have an expectation from familiarity with the tunes.

    Also, when I play the C trumpet I don't transpose the etudes down a step The added challenge of play an already high etude is good for you. once you have genral control of the horn.

    When I work on transposition I do it from the Bb as I have since my high school days. Just so you know, I play the Bb every single day. So, even though the C is my primary work horn, I'll wager that I play my Bb as much during the week as I do my C. I'll never give up playing my Bb. It's home base for me.

    ML
     
  8. MahlerBrass

    MahlerBrass Piano User

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    Oct 1, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Dare we leave out Charlier? I've always known that to be done predominantly on C trumpet, great etudes!
     

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