Excellent Home recording set up from Trent Austin

Discussion in 'Jazz / Commercial' started by trumpetnick, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I hope Trent to chime in, but I was impressed by his home recording set up, considering testing it, probably in summer season.

    15844888_1903777359842727_7542201081034550940_o.jpg

    If you have other ideas about a similar set up, feel free to chime in.
     
  2. OldSchoolEuph

    OldSchoolEuph Mezzo Piano User

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    I couldn't help noticing what's on the stand there, an Ernie Wilkins chart. Ernie Wilkins and his older brother trombonist (and Detroit big band leader for 36 years) Jimmy Wilkins met Clark Terry, who started the mumbles bit, in 1951 when he recruited both of them to tour with Bassie. When Jimmy couldn't play anymore, a surprisingly few years ago given that he's 95, he got into mumbles. I was lucky enough to be part of a HS stage band reunion holiday project this fall (started when some of us turned 50) that Jimmy, who worked with the school back when he was also helping get the Detroit-Montreaux Jazz Festival going as an adjunct teacher, laid down a mumbles riff for the middle of. I can't help noticing that his recording set-up looks pretty much the same!
    https://vimeo.com/album/4300084/video/195071528
     
  3. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I believe that Trent is about to record the chart that is on stand, hopefully we'll get to hear it soon.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Other than the mic on the stand, (is that a Royer R-121?) I've got the rest of that stuff - the wrap around sound isolation shield, mic stands, etc.

    The best thing in that pic IMO, if that mic is a Royer ribbon mic, is the microphone. I'd be curious to know what he's running it into (preamp/interface) and what's going on with the rest of the recording setup.

    I don't know enough about microphones to know what the mic is (gold shield) at the upper left side of the pic. What is that?
     
  5. Claude Gnocchi

    Claude Gnocchi Mezzo Forte User

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    Patrick- I hope trent doesn't mind me replying to your question about the "golden Mic" on the left. I have my own large recording studio near you (National Harbor, MD). From what I can see, the mic is one of those inexpensive Chinese Ribbon mics; they are so-so, I have 3 or 4 in my studio that I use for tambourines, maracas, etc. but the Royer R-121 is another matter....one of the best pro ribbon mics for trumpet on the market. There are of course, much more expensive ribbon mics around, but the Royer has become a standard for trumpet. Personally, I record my trumpet w/vintage CAD (non-ribbon) mics, like the E-350 because of the particular 2 inch tape sound they produce, but I think that the Royers are clearer....might just have to get one of them!
     
  6. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I am...let say novice to all these stuff. I have used both various clip-on and xlr mics (from cheap chinese knock-offs up to professional shure mics, recently I bought SM137) for live perfomances, but only once I made a recording, we were not used screens, the recording was made for demo purposes with my bandmates. I remember doing a recording with another ensembles in the 1990s, but then we would just use dead rooms, no screens. I have no idea what mic or preamp is using Trent, but will look forward to find out.
     
  7. Claude Gnocchi

    Claude Gnocchi Mezzo Forte User

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    Hate to tell you, but once you get into recording, it is even a greater (and much more expensive...) hobby than trumpets. I probably have more than $100K in my studio and am always looking to replace something w/a "better" (more expensive) piece. I probably have or have had most of the microphones that are used to record trumpet, yet, here I am, jonesing to now buy a Royer R-121..........incidentally, a good recording mic w/a good mic preamp can cost anywhere from $3 to $20K One of my mic preamps is a Great River MN1........quite costly.....Sometimes I wish I had not started on this venture, but I'm too deep into it.....
     
  8. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    As cold hearted as it may sounds, I don't buy something unless I think that it will facillitate me at work or eventually will give me more work opportunities. Expectation do not alway translate in reality, but that's how I find what I need. The only "thing" that I do not use anymore is my Spada C trumpet. That's my philosophy. But still curious what equipment I use, if I see it as a worthy application I may consider getting some of the above equipment.
     
  9. Bwanabass

    Bwanabass Mezzo Piano User

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    I agree with Claude! Home recording is a completely different obsession and addiction! I began collaborating with a singer-songwriter a few years back on an EP that he was working on. He would send me tracks, and I would create and record a variety of arrangements. I would send him the WAV files of all the tracks and he would pick and choose the layers and parts he wanted on the records. Early on in this collaboration, I was using an SM-57 and GarageBand- a very basic set up, but the bug had bitten me!

    Since then, I have added an inexpensive but outstanding ribbon mic and upgraded to using Logic Pro X. I am still using my 2009 MacBook Pro, which is really on the border of not hacking it. I will likely pick up an older model, 8 core Mac Pro for recording. I also upgraded my studio monitors to a nice pair of JBLs.

    My current set up consists of:
    MXL R144 ribbon mic
    Cloud Microphones Cloudlifter CL-1
    Presonus Tube Pre V2
    Presonus Audiobox 22VSL
    Pair of JBL LSR305 active monitors

    I also have a home stereo and a medium PA system in my studio room to check mixes on different types of systems.

    The Cloudlifter runs on phantom power and boosts the gain of the ribbon mic. This gives me a huge base signal with a low noise floor. Then, the tube pre adds a bit of warmth, and the Audiobox interfaces with the computer and sends audio to my headphones and to the monitors.

    The ribbon is a figure-8 pattern microphone, so I don't use a foam surround to isolate it. I want some of the room sound to hit the back side of the mic.

    A Royer ribbon mic would be a dream come true for me, but my current ribbon, especially with the Cloudlifter, is more than adequate.

    If you are looking to get into a basic recording set up, this one (minus the cost of the laptop) cost me around $1,000US, maybe a bit more when I figure in the cost of Logic Pro X and cables.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Claude, with the way that technology has been moving with recording equipment, the days of spending thousands and thousands on unbelievably expensive preamps and effects are coming to an end, at least where the home hobbyist is concerned. The Apollo preamp interfaces come with models of the big boy preamps such as Manley or Neve, and the reviewers seem to think that the models are exceptionally good. You'll always have to get good mics, but with the bevy of inexpensive and easily obtained plugins, it's possible to do some really great sounding, highly polished recording right in the home.

    In my own experimentation with my home recording equipment, I decided to see if I could track drums once. My preamp/interface is a Focusrite Saffire Pro 40, so I have the ability to track 8 preamp channels simultaneously, and I tracked drums using 8 mics

    1- Kick - Shure SM7B
    1- Snare - Shure SM57
    3 - toms - cheapo CAD TM211 - No judging! It's what I have! :-P
    2 - overheads - Audix F15 Fusion SD Condensers (set up in Recorderman configuration) The Recorder Man Drum Miking Technique
    1 - Room mic - MXL V67G LD condenser - set up about 6-7 feet in front of the kit

    As for the settings I used, once I set my gain levels, I set up my EQ, reverb and compression (all plugins or effects intrinsic to GarageBand) according to an article I found online - I did some minor tweaking based on sound, but otherwise, I took those settings in the article and applied them as closely as I could.

    Overall, I was not displeased at all with how it came out. And keep in mind I'm pretty much a noob when it comes to sound engineering. Could it have been better? Absolutely! Would it have been passable for demo purposes? Yep - absolutely. If I really decided to dig in, go to some recording workshops and get some books on the subject and really learn it, I've got a pretty capable setup, right there in my house, and I've probably got less than $2000 worth of gear. I could stand to upgrade some mics, but I've read over and over again that good technique and knowledge can make a big difference. A guy who knows what he's doing can do more with a $300 mic than a guy who knows nothing but has a $3000 mic.

    At this point, if I wanted to do more serious upgrades, I'd probably get some better mics and do some sound treatment in the room I use - it would be beneficial for mixing. (I have KRK Rokit 6 studio monitors - not great, but decent enough for a hobbyist.)
     

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